Wednesday, 19 July 2017

The cosmic dance of three dead stars could break relativity

The cosmic dance of three dead stars could break relativity

Do we have the first hints that Einstein is about to be proven wrong? A stellar system discovered in 2012 looks like the ideal experiment to tell us. By Joshua Sokol.

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Rare Human Syndrome May Explain Why Dogs are So Friendly

Rare Human Syndrome May Explain Why Dogs are So Friendly

(Inside Science) -- When it comes to sheer friendliness, few humans can match the average dog. But people with Williams syndrome may come close, their unusual genetics granting them a puppyish zeal for social interaction. Now, scientists have found that extreme friendliness in both species may share common genetic roots.

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Low-Fat Foods Are Making You Fatter

Low-Fat Foods Are Making You Fatter

Cause the fat is replaced with sugar.

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India is rolling out trains with solar-powered coaches that’ll save thousands of litres of diesel

India is rolling out trains with solar-powered coaches that’ll save thousands of litres of diesel

India's massive railway network is getting serious about its solar experiments.

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The Itch

The Itch

What if you started itching—and couldn’t stop? By Atul Gawande.

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How stress works in the human body, to make or break us

How stress works in the human body, to make or break us

The subtle flows and toxic hits of stress get under the skin, making and breaking the body and brain over a lifetime. By Bruce McEwen.

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We may have cracked the mystery of Stonehenge

We may have cracked the mystery of Stonehenge

The more archaeologists study Stonehenge, the more mysteries unfold. But a coherent story is beginning to emerge.

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A 4,000-Word Article About Checkers

A 4,000-Word Article About Checkers

… which is really about a duel between two men, one who dies, and the nature of the quest to build artificial intelligence.

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Is Dark Matter Real?

Is Dark Matter Real?

Many science-savvy people take it for granted that the universe is made not only of Carl Sagan's oft-quoted "billions and billions" of galaxies, but also a vast amount of an invisible substance called dark matter. This odd matter is thought to be a new kind of subatomic particle that doesn't interact via electromagnetism, nor the strong and weak nuclear forces. Dark matter is also supposed to be five times more prevalent in the universe than the ordinary matter of atoms.

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Vlad the Astrophysicist

Vlad the Astrophysicist

Peter Mulvey tells the story about an astrophysicist and a centuries old question.

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How Much Do Americans Know About Science?

How Much Do Americans Know About Science?

An exclusive poll shows Americans crave stronger mathematics, science schooling for U.S. kids.

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Maryam Mirzakhani’s Pioneering Mathematical Legacy

Maryam Mirzakhani’s Pioneering Mathematical Legacy

The Iranian mathematician Maryam Mirzakhani, who died on Friday, at the age of forty, was known to her colleagues as a virtuoso in the dynamics and geometry of complex surfaces—“science-fiction mathematics,” one admirer called it—and to her young daughter, Anahita, as something of an artist. At the family’s home, near Stanford University, Mirzakhani would spend hours on the floor with supersized canvases of paper, sketching out ideas, drawing diagrams and formulae, often leading Anahita, now six, to exclaim, “Oh, Mommy is painting again!”

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Where and How to See the Total Eclipse This Summer in the U.S.

Where and How to See the Total Eclipse This Summer in the U.S.

On Aug. 21, the sun’s disappearance behind the moon will be visible from the Oregon coast to South Carolina. Here are eight places to see it.

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Scientists Journey to the World's 'Lost' 8th Continent

Scientists Journey to the World's 'Lost' 8th Continent

Scientists will soon venture to the world's hidden eighth continent, the sunken land of Zealandia. The lost continent, which is mostly submerged, with all of New Zealand and a few islands peeking out from the water, is about half the size of Australia. By drilling deep into its crust or upper layer, the new scientific expedition could provide clues about how the diving of one of Earth's plates beneath another...

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Crossword lovers have brains which are 10 years younger than their age, study finds 

Crossword lovers have brains which are 10 years younger than their age, study finds 

If completing the Telegraph crossword is a daily tradition then it may be gratifying to learn that your brain is 10 years younger than your actual age. Researchers at the University of Exeter and King’s College London carried online testing on more than 17,000 healthy people aged 50 to gauge their memory, attention and reasoning.

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Brains With Alzheimer's Have More Bacteria Than Healthy Ones, Says New Study

Brains With Alzheimer's Have More Bacteria Than Healthy Ones, Says New Study

New research shows bacteria that break through the brain's defences and infected neurons could play a role in the onset of Alzheimer's, giving experts a better understanding of the disease and ways we could treat it.

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Scientists Have Reversed Brain Damage in a 2-Year-Old Girl Who Drowned in a Swimming Pool

Scientists Have Reversed Brain Damage in a 2-Year-Old Girl Who Drowned in a Swimming Pool

Researchers in the US have reported what they believe is a first-of-its-kind reversal of brain damage, after treating a drowned and resuscitated toddler with a combination of oxygen therapies.

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Hearing loss, diminished verbal fluency and hospitalizations can signal cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease, studies find

Hearing loss, diminished verbal fluency and hospitalizations can signal cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease, studies find

Spotting signs is crucial because drug treatment and prevention strategies are most effective at the earliest stages of dementia

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Tuesday, 18 July 2017

Seaweed shown to reduce 99% methane from cattle

Seaweed shown to reduce 99% methane from cattle

News that a slight dietary change could dramatically reduce the amount of environmentally harmful methane gas released by cattle has been given an enthusiastic welcome by Irish farmers. Researchers at James Cook University in Queensland, Australia, found the addition of less than 2 per cent dried seaweed to a cow’s diet could reduce their methane emissions by as much as 99 per cent.

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The Myth of Drug Expiration Dates

The Myth of Drug Expiration Dates

Hospitals and pharmacies are required to toss expired drugs, no matter how expensive or vital. Meanwhile the FDA has long known that many remain safe and potent for years longer.

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Elon Musk warns that AI is human society’s biggest risk

Elon Musk warns that AI is human society’s biggest risk

The entrepreneur Elon Musk warns that AI is the human society’s biggest risk and urged high ranking US politicians to do something about it before it’s too late. He made his points while speaking at the National Governors Association summer meeting. Musk means that if the authorities does not provide proper regulation, the industry will become autonomous and could pose a threat to jobs and also the safety of the nation. As an example he mentioned that AI’s could start a war by doing fake news.

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Saudi Arabia exports extremism to many countries - including Germany, study

Saudi Arabia exports extremism to many countries - including Germany, study

A British study has found that Saudi Arabia plays a key role in the radicalization of Muslims. The Wahhabi influence, fueled by oil money, can be seen in Germany as well, says researcher Susanne Schröter. By Matthias von Hein. (July 9, 2017)

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America’s greatest eclipse is coming, and this man wants you to see it

America’s greatest eclipse is coming, and this man wants you to see it

The Aug. 21 total solar eclipse will be a spectacle like nothing most people have seen.

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These Famous People Were Dug Up After Death—Here's Why

These Famous People Were Dug Up After Death—Here's Why

From presidents to outlaws, many high-profile people have been exhumed to answer questions about how they lived and died.

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Monday, 17 July 2017

How does caffeine keep us awake?

How does caffeine keep us awake?

Over 100,000 metric tons of caffeine are consumed around the world every year. That’s equivalent to the weight of 14 Eiffel Towers! Caffeine helps us feel alert, focused, and energetic, even if we haven’t had enough sleep — but it can also raise our blood pressure and make us feel anxious. So how does it keep us awake? Hanan Qasim shares the science behind the world’s most widely used drug.

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Gravitational waves could show hints of extra dimensions

Gravitational waves could show hints of extra dimensions

HIDDEN dimensions could cause ripples through reality by modifying gravitational waves – and spotting such signatures of extra dimensions could help solve some of the biggest mysteries of the universe. Physicists have long wondered why gravity is so weak compared with the other fundamental forces. This may be because some of it is leaking away into extra dimensions beyond the three spatial dimensions we experience.

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The best books on Trees — a Five Books interview

The best books on Trees — a Five Books interview

Why are trees so vital to human life, not just scientifically but culturally, spiritually? David George Haskell shares five books that help us to understand.

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How Much of the Earth Can You See at Once?

How Much of the Earth Can You See at Once?



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This Is Your Brain on Architecture

This Is Your Brain on Architecture

A new book explores the neuroscience of architecture, finding that many buildings and urban spaces fail the people who use them.

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European languages by number of native speakers

European languages by number of native speakers

There are almost a hundred different languages spoken natively in Europe, but only about 40 of them have 1 million speakers or more. The map below shows estimates of the total number of native

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Germans force Korean Boeing to land

Germans force Korean Boeing to land

German air force jetists have seized a Korean Air Boeing 777 on Saturday night and forced to land at Stuttgart Airport. The aircraft was in transit with 211 passengers from Seoul to Zurich, Switzerland, when the radio contact was suddenly discontinued, a spokesperson said. After the plane landed, a technical defect was detected, police said.

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Felice Frankel: Creating images to explain science concepts

Felice Frankel: Creating images to explain science concepts

MIT researcher helps scientists and engineers hone their visual imagery.

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How poverty affects the brain

How poverty affects the brain

An unprecedented study in Bangladesh could reveal how malnutrition, poor sanitation and other challenges make their mark on child development.

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Sunday, 16 July 2017

Living Another Day, Thanks to Grandparents Who Couldn’t Sleep

Living Another Day, Thanks to Grandparents Who Couldn’t Sleep

Age-related changes in sleep patterns may have helped early humans survive by ensuring at least one person was always alert to nighttime threats.

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Ravens ignore a treat in favor of a useful tool for the future

Ravens ignore a treat in favor of a useful tool for the future

Planning ahead means they're even smarter than we thought.

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Federal Science Official Warns Trump Plan Would 'Reduce or Eliminate' Important Data Access, Research

Federal Science Official Warns Trump Plan Would 'Reduce or Eliminate' Important Data Access, Research

A U.S. Geological Survey program coordinator has sent an alert to colleagues around the world, warning that the Trump administration's proposed 2018 budget cuts, if approved, will undermine important data-gathering programs and cooperative studies in areas including forests, volcanoes, flooding, wildfires, extreme precipitation and climate change.

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Polar bear attacks on people set to rise as climate changes

Polar bear attacks on people set to rise as climate changes

Dwindling sea ice is driving hungry bears on to land and towards human settlements

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Did You Know The English Language Has A Secret Brother?

Did You Know The English Language Has A Secret Brother?

You may want to sit down for this because you are about to find out your Germanic mother gave birth to another language in the North of the Netherlands.

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‘I missed my nap for this’: 101-year-old sprinter breaks 100-meter dash record

‘I missed my nap for this’: 101-year-old sprinter breaks 100-meter dash record

Watch your back, Usain Bolt — there’s a new 100-meter dash superstar and she looks unstoppable. Meet 101-year-old Julia “Hurricane” Hawkins, who on Saturday became the oldest female athlete to ever compete in the USA Track and Field Outdoors Masters Championships. Not only that, but by running the 100 meters in 40.12 seconds, she shaved more than six seconds off the current certified world record for women aged 100 or older.

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The World’s First Celestial Spectator Sport: Astronomer Maria Mitchell’s Stunning Account of the 1869 Total Solar Eclipse

The World’s First Celestial Spectator Sport: Astronomer Maria Mitchell’s Stunning Account of the 1869 Total Solar Eclipse

Trumpeted by the press as “the great eclipse of the nineteenth century,” the total solar eclipse of August 7, 1869 was the world’s first astronomical event marketed as popular entertainment — not merely a pinnacle of excitement for the scientific community, but a celestial spectator sport for laypeople.

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Stress And Poverty May Explain High Rates Of Dementia In African-Americans

Stress And Poverty May Explain High Rates Of Dementia In African-Americans

New research finds that African-Americans who grow up in harsh environments and have many stressful experiences are much more likely to develop Alzheimer's or some other form of dementia.

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The Angry Chef by Anthony Warner review – detox and other food nonsense

The Angry Chef by Anthony Warner review – detox and other food nonsense

Warner has it in for nutrition experts, dieticians, pseudoscience – and Gwyneth Paltrow.

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Art can be a powerful medicine against dementia

Art can be a powerful medicine against dementia

Nicci Gerrard, the co-founder of John’s Campaign, on a new parliamentary report that confirms the profoundly beneficial role of the arts in helping people with dementia.

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Why I locked my father away

Why I locked my father away

I thought I could care for my dad after his Alzheimer's diagnosis. Like many caregivers, I was quickly overwhelmed

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Saturday, 15 July 2017

The cholesterol and calorie hypotheses are both dead — it is time to focus on the real culprit: insulin resistance

The cholesterol and calorie hypotheses are both dead — it is time to focus on the real culprit: insulin resistance

Emerging evidence shows that insulin resistance is the most important predictor of cardiovascular and type 2 diabetes.

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Scientists Design Solar Cell That Captures Nearly All Solar Spectrum Energy

Scientists Design Solar Cell That Captures Nearly All Solar Spectrum Energy

A George Washington University researcher helped design and construct a prototype for a new solar cell that integrates multiple cells stacked into a single device capable of capturing nearly all of the energy in the solar spectrum. The new design, which converts direct sunlight to electricity with 44.5 percent efficiency, has the potential to become the most efficient solar cell in the world.

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Self-Driving Taxis Will Become the Most Disgusting Spaces on Earth

Self-Driving Taxis Will Become the Most Disgusting Spaces on Earth

With the entire automotive industry looking toward a future of driverless mobility, commercially owned self-driving taxis seem poised to be on the frontline of tomorrow. However, nobody seemed to realize that these vehicles will eventually become little more than mobile toilets.

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Maryam Mirzakhani, first woman to win maths' Fields Medal, dies

Maryam Mirzakhani, first woman to win maths' Fields Medal, dies

Acclaimed Iranian mathematician Maryam Mirzakhani dies of breast cancer aged 40.

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