Wednesday, 23 May 2018

American suffers brain injury after 'sound' incident in China

American suffers brain injury after 'sound' incident in China

The US embassy in China issued a health alert Wednesday after a US government employee experienced an "abnormal" sound and suffered a mild brain ...

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Dr. Robert Lustig The Hacking of the American Mind at the San Francisco Public Library

Dr. Robert Lustig The Hacking of the American Mind at the San Francisco Public Library

A very insightful lecture that will go in a direction you won't expect.

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New soft robotic skin automatically heals itself, even if you shoot it full of holes

New soft robotic skin automatically heals itself, even if you shoot it full of holes

If there’s one thing that scientists absolutely should be working on, it’s a self-regenerating robo-Deadpool or the eerily-fluid T-1000 Terminator. Thankfully, a team of scientists just took an important first step towards building a robot that can keep on truckin’ even with a couple of bullet holes improve its ventilation.

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My Own Personal Nothingness

My Own Personal Nothingness

From a childhood hallucination to the halls of theoretical physics. By Alan Lightman.

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Tuesday, 22 May 2018

Ariane chief seems frustrated with SpaceX for driving down launch costs

Ariane chief seems frustrated with SpaceX for driving down launch costs

“I cannot tell my teams: 'Goodbye, see you next year!'”

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Most common childhood cancer 'partly caused by lack of infection'

Most common childhood cancer 'partly caused by lack of infection'

Clean modern homes, antiseptic wipes and the understandable desire to protect small babies against any infection are all part of the cause of the most common form of childhood cancer, a leading expert has concluded after more than 30 years of research. Childhood acute leukaemia, says the highly respected Prof Mel Greaves, is nothing to do with power lines or nuclear fuel reprocessing stations. Nor is it to do with hot dogs and hamburgers or the Vatican radio mast, as have also been suggested.

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A couple of boring videos

A couple of boring videos

The Perth Airport tunnel borers have broken through to the site of the planned Airport Central Station.

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Human race just 0.01% of all life but has eradicated most other living things

Human race just 0.01% of all life but has eradicated most other living things

Groundbreaking assessment of all life on Earth reveals humanity’s surprisingly tiny part in it as well as our disproportionate impact

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Finnish university's online AI course is open to everyone

Finnish university's online AI course is open to everyone

Helsinki University in Finland has launched a course on artificial intelligence -- one that's completely free and open to everyone around the world. Unlike Carnegie Mellon's new undergrad degree in AI, which the institution created to train future experts in the field, Helsinki's offering is more of a beginner course for those who want to know more about it. A lot of tech giants like Google now have divisions working on artificial intelligence projects, and even whole non-tech industries already depend on AI for various tasks.

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Self-Blame, Rumination, and the Trauma of Birth

Self-Blame, Rumination, and the Trauma of Birth

Birth is miraculous, but not always simple. For some, the difficulties of birth last long after the baby is born. Looking at almost 200 first-time moms, new research published in the Journal of Maternal-fetal and Neonatal Medicine (link is external) found that many of them experienced symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)...

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A German Team Is Now Trying to Make the ‘Impossible’ EmDrive Engine

A German Team Is Now Trying to Make the ‘Impossible’ EmDrive Engine

German physicists launched the SpaceDrive project to explore possible sources of error in EmDrive experiments. Their first experiment identified a possible source of false positives in past successful EmDrive tests. Since the beginning of the space race over half-a-century ago, humans have walked on the moon and remotely explored the surface of two other planets in our solar system with robots. But so far, only a single spacecraft has made it to interstellar space: Voyager 1...

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Magic mushroom treatment improves emotional face recognition in depressed patients

Magic mushroom treatment improves emotional face recognition in depressed patients

Preliminary research suggests that psilocybin-based treatment can improve emotional processing in depressed patients. The new findings are reported in the scientific journal Psychopharmacology. Psilocybin is the primary mind-altering substance in psychedelic “magic” mushrooms. The drug can profoundly alter the way a person experiences the world by producing changes in mood, sensory perception, time perception, and sense of self.

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Sunday, 20 May 2018

Want to help your child succeed in school? Add language to the math, reading mix

Want to help your child succeed in school? Add language to the math, reading mix

Research shows that the more skills children bring with them to kindergarten – in basic math, reading, even friendship and cooperation – the more likely they will succeed in those same areas in school. Hence, “kindergarten readiness” is the goal of many preschool programs, and a motivator for many parents.

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Vitamin D3 vital in treating child malnutrition

Vitamin D3 vital in treating child malnutrition

High doses of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) were found to be effective in helping treat severe child malnutrition, a new study conducted in Pakistan’s Punjab province suggests. Researchers from the University of the Punjab (PU), Lahore, and the Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) said doses of vitamin D3 supplements, alongside regular treatment for malnutrition, significantly helped a group of 185 malnourished children aged 2—58 months to gain weight and height, as well as improve motor skills and learning abilities.

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IBM warns of instant breaking of encryption by quantum computers: 'Move your data today'

IBM warns of instant breaking of encryption by quantum computers: 'Move your data today'

Welcome to the future transparency of today as quantum computers reveal all currently encrypted secrets -- a viable scenario within just a few years.

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People in small towns are EIGHT TIMES happier than city-dwellers

People in small towns are EIGHT TIMES happier than city-dwellers

People who live in rural areas are happier than city dwellers, new research has found. The study surveyed 400,000 people across Canada using a widely-recognized happiness scale. Cities have higher salaries, higher education levels and lower unemployment rates. However, that meant nothing in terms of joy: people who lived in the countryside were, on average, eight times happier than people in urban areas, the study found.

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Cannabis: it matters how young you start

Cannabis: it matters how young you start

What a difference a year or two can make: If you started smoking marijuana at the start of your teens, your risk of having a drug abuse problem by age 28 is 68 per cent, but if you started smoking between 15 and 17 your risk drops to 44 per cent, according to a new study by Université de Montréal researchers.

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Saturday, 19 May 2018

Single-tablet HIV treatment shows better outcomes over multi-tablet regimen

Single-tablet HIV treatment shows better outcomes over multi-tablet regimen

HIV patients on a single-tablet daily regimen had better outcomes than patients taking multiple pills per day, a new study shows.

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How a Pioneer of Machine Learning Became One of Its Sharpest Critics

How a Pioneer of Machine Learning Became One of Its Sharpest Critics

He helped artificial intelligence gain a strong grasp on probability, but laments that it still can't compute cause and effect.

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Infinitesimal Odds: A Scientist Finds Her Child’s Rare Illness Stems From the Gene She Studies

Infinitesimal Odds: A Scientist Finds Her Child’s Rare Illness Stems From the Gene She Studies

When it comes to studying the genetics of the brain, Soo-Kyung Lee is a star, yet she was stunned to discover the cause of her daughter’s devastating disabilities.

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Investigation Reveals Tyson Foods as #1 Culprit in Largest "Dead Zone" on Earth

Investigation Reveals Tyson Foods as #1 Culprit in Largest "Dead Zone" on Earth

Nearly 9000 square-miles of ocean along the Gulf Coast is uninhabitable by marine life. Loaded with agricultural toxins and devoid of oxygen, it’s the largest “dead zone” in US history, and last summer it got even bigger. We’ve known the cause of the ecological “dead zone” for decades — fertilizer run-off from Big Agriculture via the Mississippi River — but a new investigative report identifies the number one polluter by name, Tyson Foods.

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Designing tomorrow's tech-friendly fashion

Designing tomorrow's tech-friendly fashion

Or I WANT MORE POCKETS DAMMIT! Our tech requirements are stressing today's fashion. Fortunately, a new generation of designers is looking to the future of tech-capable clothing.

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Are octopuses living evidence of intersstellar life?

Are octopuses living evidence of intersstellar life?

OCTOPUSES are weird. This is not just because they look odd. It’s not because they’re disturbingly smart. It’s because they have a strange power. The ability to edit their own bodies. This has biologists scratching their heads. Evolution doesn’t work that way. It’s supposed to be spurred by genetic mutations — a change in DNA — that proves to be beneficial to the host.

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This Startup Wants To Replace Cars (And Subways) With Elevated Pods

This Startup Wants To Replace Cars (And Subways) With Elevated Pods

Transit X’s plan would set up fast-moving, solar-powered personal transit units to whisk you anywhere you wanted to go.

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Under certain conditions, bacterial signals set the stage for leukemia

Under certain conditions, bacterial signals set the stage for leukemia

A new study by researchers from the University of Chicago Medicine shows that bacterial signals are crucial to the development of a precursor condition to leukemia, which can be induced by disrupting the intestinal barrier or by introducing a bacterial infection.

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Friday, 18 May 2018

10 rivers are responsible for 90% of the plastic in the ocean

10 rivers are responsible for 90% of the plastic in the ocean

Around 90 percent of the plastic polluting our oceans comes from just ten rivers, a new study has shown. Eight of those rivers are in Asia, with the remaining two — the Nile and the Niger — in Africa. The report, conducted by the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research in Germany, was based on dozens of reports, as well as the debris collected at 79 sampling sites along 57 rivers.

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This Man Is the Godfather the AI Community Wants to Forget

This Man Is the Godfather the AI Community Wants to Forget

Jürgen Schmidhuber says he’ll make machines smarter than us. His peers wish he’d just shut up.

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Can Bringing Back Mammoths Help Stop Climate Change?

Can Bringing Back Mammoths Help Stop Climate Change?

If you managed to time travel back to Ice-Age Europe, you might be forgiven for thinking you had instead crash-landed in some desolate part of the African savannah. But the chilly temperatures and the presence of six-ton shaggy beasts with extremely long tusks would confirm you really were in the Pleistocene epoch, otherwise known as the Ice Age. You’d be visiting the mammoth steppe, an environment that stretched from Spain across Eurasia and the Bering Strait to Canada.

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Common fungal infections are 'becoming incurable' and causing more deaths than malaria or breast cancer worldwide, say researchers

Common fungal infections are 'becoming incurable' and causing more deaths than malaria or breast cancer worldwide, say researchers

Common fungal infections are “becoming incurable” with global mortality exceeding that for malaria or breast cancer because of drug-resistant strains which “terrify” doctors and threaten the food chain, a new report has warned. Writing in a special “resistance” edition of the journal Science, researchers from Imperial College London and Exeter University have shown how crops, animals and people are all threatened by nearly omnipresent fungi. By Alex Matthews-King.

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NASA’s Jim Bridenstine Agrees Humans Are Responsible for Climate Change

NASA’s Jim Bridenstine Agrees Humans Are Responsible for Climate Change

It's no secret that the Trump administration has filled cabinet positions and other senior staff jobs with people who reject or ignore established climate science. On Monday, for example, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told reporters at the National Press Club in Washington that he’s “not going to get into the climate debate.” He also said he could not endorse climate research by one of his own agencies, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, whose satellites...

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Not paying attention in class? China’s facial recognition tech will snitch on you

Not paying attention in class? China’s facial recognition tech will snitch on you

Students "don't dare" let themselves be distracted.

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Cannabidiol significantly reduces seizures in patients with severe form of epilepsy

Cannabidiol significantly reduces seizures in patients with severe form of epilepsy

Cannabidiol (CBD), a compound derived from the cannabis plant that does not produce a “high” and has been an increasing focus of medical research, was shown in a new large-scale, randomized, controlled trial to significantly reduce the number of dangerous seizures in patients with a severe form of epilepsy called Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

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Thursday, 17 May 2018

New study quantifies bitcoin’s ludicrous energy consumption

New study quantifies bitcoin’s ludicrous energy consumption

Bitcoin could consume 7.7 gigawatts by the end of 2018.

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Trump’s plan to privatize the ISS by 2025 probably won’t work, NASA’s inspector general says

Trump’s plan to privatize the ISS by 2025 probably won’t work, NASA’s inspector general says

The Trump Administration’s plan to hand the International Space Station off to the private sector by 2025 probably won’t work, says a government auditor. It’s unlikely that any commercial companies will be able to take on the enormous costs of operating the ISS within the next six years, the auditor said.

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SpaceX's first Falcon 9 Block 5 returns to port in pristine condition

SpaceX's first Falcon 9 Block 5 returns to port in pristine condition

SpaceX’s first launched and landed Falcon 9 Block 5 booster has returned to port after a handful of days at sea, hopefully marking the beginning of a long and storied future of commercial missions. The booster – numbered B1046 – appears to be in extraordinarily good shape, more or less unscathed after a relatively high-energy reentry. Photographer Tom Cross documented the historic return in person at Port Canaveral.

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Glyphosate shown to disrupt microbiome 'at safe levels', study claims

Glyphosate shown to disrupt microbiome 'at safe levels', study claims

Study on rats said to show that the chemical, found in Monsanto’s Roundup weedkiller, poses ‘a significant public health concern’

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Wednesday, 16 May 2018

Yanny or Laurel? The Internet Is Going Mad Over This Auditory Illusion

Yanny or Laurel? The Internet Is Going Mad Over This Auditory Illusion

It's always fun when the internet goes mad over a new illusion. This time, instead of a visual illusion like the goddamn dress, we can't stop talking about one little sound.

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Non-Human Animals Can Mentally Replay Past Events: Study

Non-Human Animals Can Mentally Replay Past Events: Study

A team of Indiana University researchers has reported the first evidence that non-human animals (rats) can replay a stream of multiple episodic memories. The study was published in the journal Current Biology.

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The Border Patrol’s ‘Constitution-Free’ Zone Is Probably Larger Than You Think

The Border Patrol’s ‘Constitution-Free’ Zone Is Probably Larger Than You Think

All of Michigan, D.C., and a large chunk of Pennsylvania are part of the area where Border Patrol has expanded search and seizure rights. Here’s what it means to live or travel there. By Tanvi Misra,

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MH370 Malaysia Airlines Captain ‘Deliberately Evaded Radar,’ Crashed Plane in Murder-Suicide, Investigators Say

MH370 Malaysia Airlines Captain ‘Deliberately Evaded Radar,’ Crashed Plane in Murder-Suicide, Investigators Say

The captain of the MH370 Malaysia Airlines flight “deliberately evaded radar” and crashed the plane in a murder-suicide that killed 239 passengers more than four years ago, according to aviation experts. The mysterious disappearance of the Boeing 777 flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing has puzzled the world, but a panel of investigators claim they have worked out what happened on board the flight in 2014.

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Azul Maya: not only a pigment but a high-end nanomaterial used by the ancient Maya

Azul Maya: not only a pigment but a high-end nanomaterial used by the ancient Maya

When we talk about Maya heritage, one of the most important legacies in the Yucatan Peninsula is the “Azul Maya” (Maya Blue), a pigment developed widely by this civilization and used by different Mesoamerican cultures for the decoration of ceramics, textiles and murals, as explained by Romeo de Coss Gómez, researcher attached to the Center for Research and Advanced Studies (Cinvestav) in Mérida, Yucatán.

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Tuesday, 15 May 2018

UJ team discovers silver lining in the dark clouds of cancer

UJ team discovers silver lining in the dark clouds of cancer

Researchers at the University of Johannesburg may have come up with a silver bullet for certain cancers. Laboratory tests suggest a newly discovered family of silver-based anti-cancer drugs could provide smaller dosages‚ lower toxicity and fewer adverse side-effects.

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Google Employees Resign in Protest Against Pentagon Contract

Google Employees Resign in Protest Against Pentagon Contract

It’s been nearly three months since many Google employees—and the public—learned about the company’s decision to provide artificial intelligence to a controversial military pilot program known as Project Maven.

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A monster black hole has been discovered, and it's growing very fast

A monster black hole has been discovered, and it's growing very fast

Australian scientists have discovered the fastest growing black hole known in the universe. It is growing at a rate of 1 per cent every 1 million years, and it is so big it is consuming a mass equivalent to our Sun every two days. A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away...

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Employers are monitoring computers, toilet breaks – even emotions.

Employers are monitoring computers, toilet breaks – even emotions.

From microchip implants to wristband trackers and sensors that can detect fatigue and depression, new technology is enabling employers to watch staff in more and more intrusive ways. How worried should we be?

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Mini-antibodies discovered in sharks and camels could lead to drugs for cancer and other diseases

Mini-antibodies discovered in sharks and camels could lead to drugs for cancer and other diseases

Helen Dooley admits that she often gets puzzled responses when she describes her work. "People say, ‘You bleed sharks for a living?’" That's an overstatement, but every couple of weeks she and a helper drop by several large fiberglass tanks at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology on the Inner Harbor in Baltimore, Maryland. They net a cat shark or nurse shark and wrestle it into a small pool of water that contains a mild sedative. The drug calms the shark so they can lift it from the water and puncture a vein in its tail.

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Monday, 14 May 2018

Plastic Bag Found at the Bottom of World's Deepest Ocean Trench

Plastic Bag Found at the Bottom of World's Deepest Ocean Trench

Planet or Plastic? : Even one of the most remote places on Earth couldn't hide from the scourge of plastic trash.

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