Saturday, 21 July 2018

'Concussion pill' using cannabis shows promise

'Concussion pill' using cannabis shows promise

A "concussion pill" under development in Miami using cannabis is showing progress for treatment of traumatic brain injuries. In a pre-clinical study, the combination of a hemp-derived cannabinoid and an NMDA amino acid anesthetic is showing improved cognitive function in rodents with traumatic brain injuries compared with individual components.

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Will Not Let Me Go

Will Not Let Me Go

Dallas, Texas. 1996. Fred Strickland has Alzheimer’s. By Stephen Granade.

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The Oral History of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing

The Oral History of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing

The knuckle-biting story of the first lunar landing from the people who were there.

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Neanderthal man knew how to make fire, study of stone tools up to 50,000 years old indicates

Neanderthal man knew how to make fire, study of stone tools up to 50,000 years old indicates

Neanderthal man knew how to make a fire by striking stone to create sparks, researchers said Thursday after analyzing several tools found at sites in France dating from 50,000 years ago. It was already known that Neanderthals used fire but it was mostly thought to have occurred by natural causes such as lightning or volcanic eruptions, although perhaps they did know techniques for creating a flame.

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Friday, 20 July 2018

Raising My Child in a Doomed World

Raising My Child in a Doomed World

Some would say the mistake was having our daughter in the first place. By Roy Scranton.

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Nike Says Its $250 Running Shoes Will Make You Run Much Faster.

Nike Says Its $250 Running Shoes Will Make You Run Much Faster.

An analysis of nearly 500,000 running times estimates the effect of shoes on race performance.

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People who use homeopathy and alternative remedies for cancer treatment are twice as likely to die from disease

People who use homeopathy and alternative remedies for cancer treatment are twice as likely to die from disease

People who use homeopathy, herbal remedies and other alternative therapies as part of their cancer treatment are, on average, twice as likely to die from the disease as those who use conventional treatment only, a study has shown. This is because cancer patients using complementary therapies were much more likely to refuse some or all recommended treatment, resulting in a much poorer prognosis, Yale University researchers found.

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Mystery black sarcophagus opened in Egypt

Mystery black sarcophagus opened in Egypt

Archaeologists unseal a huge black granite sarcophagus found in the ancient city of Alexandria.

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Why getting back to the moon is so damn hard

Why getting back to the moon is so damn hard

The $20 million Lunar X Prize was supposed to send startups into space. The cost turned out to be far higher than the reward—but the competitors were never really in it for the trophy.

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Robot chemist could revolutionise study of new molecules through machine learning

Robot chemist could revolutionise study of new molecules through machine learning

Researcher Lee Cronin hopes the device will lead to discoveries of new drugs

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Traveling to the sun: Why won't Parker Solar Probe melt?

Traveling to the sun: Why won't Parker Solar Probe melt?

This summer, NASA's Parker Solar Probe will launch to travel closer to the Sun, deeper into the solar atmosphere, than any mission before it. If Earth was at one end of a yard-stick and the Sun on the other, Parker Solar Probe will make it to within four inches of the solar surface.

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There is a Light That Never Goes Out

There is a Light That Never Goes Out

Dammit, you big stupid orange dog, I love you.

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How to Survive America's Kill List

How to Survive America's Kill List

When a U.S. citizen heard he was on his own country’s drone target list, he wasn’t sure he believed it. After five near-misses, he does – and is suing the United States to contest his own execution. By Matt Taibbi.

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Thursday, 19 July 2018

Coral recovery slowing down on Great Barrier Reef

Coral recovery slowing down on Great Barrier Reef

Over the last three decades the Great Barrier Reef has been hit by a series of intense cyclones, bleaching, crown of thorn starfish outbreaks and flood events that have caused well-documented, but reparable damage. Scientists have hoped that an extended period of benign conditions would allow the natural processes of reef restoration to flourish, and many of the hardest-hit regions to return to a healthier, more colourful and biodiverse state.

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If the first men on the moon had become stranded, President Nixon would have given this speech 

If the first men on the moon had become stranded, President Nixon would have given this speech 

White House speechwriter Bill Safire penned the address "In event of moon disaster" on July 18, 1969 – 49 years ago Wednesday. The address was for President Richard Nixon to read in the event from the astronauts of Apollo 11 became stranded on the Moon. From Apollo 11's three man crew, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin went down to the surface of the moon while Michael Collins remained behind. Armstrong and Aldrin might have been able to return to the mission's lunar orbiter, where Collins was waiting.

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A Study Links Night Exposure to Blue Light with Breast and Prostate Cancer

A Study Links Night Exposure to Blue Light with Breast and Prostate Cancer

A study performed by an international team led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a centre supported by the ”la Caixa” Foundation, reports a link between exposure to blue light at night and higher risk of developing breast and prostate cancer. Blue light is a range of the visible light spectrum emitted by most white LEDs and many tablet and phone screens. The results have been published in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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One 'Oddball' Among 12 Newfound Moons Discovered Orbiting Jupiter

One 'Oddball' Among 12 Newfound Moons Discovered Orbiting Jupiter

Scientists have discovered 12 previously unknown moons orbiting Jupiter, and one of them is a real oddball. While hunting for the proposed Planet Nine, a massive planet that some believe could lie beyond Pluto, a team of scientists, led by Scott Sheppard from the Carnegie Institution for Science, found the 12 moons orbiting Jupiter. With this discovery, Jupiter now has a staggering 79 known orbiting moons — more than any other planet in the solar system.

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SpaceX to attempt five recoveries in less than two weeks as fleet activity ramps up

SpaceX to attempt five recoveries in less than two weeks as fleet activity ramps up

That's a Lot of flights.

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Larry Page is quietly amassing a ‘flying car’ empire

Larry Page is quietly amassing a ‘flying car’ empire

One flying car seems absurd; Larry Page has three.

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Fukushima’s nuclear signature found in California wine

Fukushima’s nuclear signature found in California wine

The Japanese nuclear disaster bathed north America in a radioactive cloud. Now pharmacologists have found the telltale signature in California wine made at the time.

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The Divine Fallacy: When People Use ‘God’ as the Explanation

The Divine Fallacy: When People Use ‘God’ as the Explanation

The divine fallacy is a logical fallacy where someone assumes that a certain phenomenon must occur as a result of divine intervention, simply because they don’t know how else to explain it, or because they can’t imagine that this isn’t the case. For example, if someone doesn’t understand how evolution works, they might display the divine fallacy if they claim that their inability...

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The Loudest Sound Ever Heard

The Loudest Sound Ever Heard

When Krakatoa erupted, the sound it made circled the globe not one, but four times. By Aatish Bhatia.

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Archeologists discover that bread was part of the real paleo diet

Archeologists discover that bread was part of the real paleo diet

Charred remains of a flatbread baked about 14,500 years ago in a stone fireplace at a site in northeastern Jordan have given researchers a delectable surprise: people began making bread, a vital staple food, thousands of years before they developed agriculture.

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Early Supper Associated With Lower Risk of Breast and Prostate Cancer

Early Supper Associated With Lower Risk of Breast and Prostate Cancer

Having an early supper or leaving an interval of at least two hours before going to bed are both associated with a lower risk of breast and prostate cancer. Specifically, people who take their evening meal before 9 pm or wait at least two hours before going to sleep have an approximate 20% lower risk of those types of cancer compared to people who have supper after 10pm or those who eat and go to bed very close afterwards, respectively.

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Revolutionary glass building blocks generate their own solar energy

Revolutionary glass building blocks generate their own solar energy

There’s a new building block in town, and it generates its own clean energy. Researchers from Exeter University developed new glass blocks that are embedded with small solar cells. Not only do the blocks generate energy, but they also provide thermal insulation and allow natural light to enter buildings.

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Southwest Airlines will stop serving peanuts and people are pissed

Southwest Airlines will stop serving peanuts and people are pissed

Peanuts were an iconic part of Southwest flights.

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Is It Possible to Smell Weakness? Lemurs Can

Is It Possible to Smell Weakness? Lemurs Can

An injured ring-tailed lemur’s personal scent plummets, and others can use that as a signal to swoop in on mates or territory. By Liz Langley.

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Australians tried to do the right thing by recycling but then we discovered we’d been played for mugs

Australians tried to do the right thing by recycling but then we discovered we’d been played for mugs

Keep America Beautiful managed to shift the entire debate about America’s garbage problem. ... the ‘litterbug’ became the real villain, and KAB supported fines and jail time for people who carelessly tossed out their trash, despite the fact that, clearly, ‘littering’ is a relatively tiny part of the garbage problem in this country.”

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Wednesday, 18 July 2018

Meat and dairy companies to surpass oil industry as world’s biggest polluters

Meat and dairy companies to surpass oil industry as world’s biggest polluters

Meat and dairy companies are on track to be the world’s biggest contributors to climate change, outpacing even the fossil fuel industry, according to a new report. To arrive at this conclusion, non-profit organisations the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy and GRAIN conducted an analysis of the planet’s 35 largest meat and dairy companies. They found that broadly speaking the companies were being secretive about their emissions data and few had set hard targets intended to deal with their pollution.

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Welcome to the Meghalayan Age

Welcome to the Meghalayan Age

The official history of Earth has a new chapter - and we are in it. Geologists have classified the last 4,200 years as being a distinct age in the story of our planet. They are calling it the Meghalayan Age, the onset of which was marked by a mega-drought that crushed a number of civilisations worldwide. The International Chronostratigraphic Chart, the famous diagram depicting the timeline for Earth's history (seen on many classroom walls) will be updated.

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Scientists discover 'quadrillion tons of diamond' beneath Earth's surface

Scientists discover 'quadrillion tons of diamond' beneath Earth's surface

Scientists believe there could be more than a quadrillion tons of diamond scattered beneath the Earth's surface. The diamonds were found by analysing seismic records - essentially sound waves travelling through the Earth triggered by ground-shaking forces. Dr Ulrich Faul, a research scientist at MIT, explained that one of diamond's many special properties is the speed at which sound waves travel through the material.

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‘My brain feels like it’s been punched’: the intolerable rise of perfectionism

‘My brain feels like it’s been punched’: the intolerable rise of perfectionism

The pursuit of perfection, taken to extremes, can lead to OCD and depression – and the number of students reporting the problem has jumped by 33% since 1989

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Timeline of the far future

Timeline of the far future

While predictions of the future can never be absolutely certain, present understanding in various scientific fields allows for the prediction of far-future events, if only in the broadest outline. These fields include astrophysics, which has revealed how planets and stars form, interact, and die; particle physics, which has revealed how matter behaves at the smallest scales; evolutionary biology, which predicts how life will evolve over time; and plate tectonics, which shows how continents shift over millennia.

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Why diagnosing Alzheimer’s today is so difficult—and how we can do better

Why diagnosing Alzheimer’s today is so difficult—and how we can do better

Bill Gates believes we need a better way of diagnosing Alzheimer’s before we’re able to slow the progression of the disease.

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Rolls-Royce is developing tiny 'cockroach' robots to crawl in and fix airplane engines

Rolls-Royce is developing tiny 'cockroach' robots to crawl in and fix airplane engines

The U.K. engineer plans to cut down on flight time lost by airlines to essential maintenance.

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Microscopic trampoline may help create networks of quantum computers

Microscopic trampoline may help create networks of quantum computers

A microscopic trampoline could help engineers to overcome a major hurdle for quantum computers, researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) report in a new study. Scientists at JILA, a joint institute of CU Boulder and NIST, have developed a device that uses a small plate to absorb microwave energy and bounce it into laser light--a crucial step for sending quantum signals over long distances.

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Tuesday, 17 July 2018

Plutonium is missing, but the government says nothing

Plutonium is missing, but the government says nothing

Two security experts from the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory drove to San Antonio, Texas, in March 2017 with a sensitive mission: to retrieve dangerous nuclear materials from a nonprofit research lab there. Their task, according to documents and interviews, was to ensure that the radioactive materials did not fall into the wrong hands on the way back to Idaho, where the government maintains a stockpile of nuclear explosive materials for the military and others.

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Putting the “crow” in necrophilia

Putting the “crow” in necrophilia

In all, I tested 309 individual pairs of crows; or in other words, once again I freaked out a lot of Seattle residents wondering why there was a woman with a camera, binoculars, and some dead animals loitering in front of their house for long periods of time. By Kaeli Swift.

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Massive study finds that a sizeable minority of us are in jobs that don’t fit our primary occupational interests

Massive study finds that a sizeable minority of us are in jobs that don’t fit our primary occupational interests

In theory, our personal traits and interests should affect the jobs we pursue and where we thrive the most. This assumption is baked into the Work Psychology theory of “person-environment fit” and it’s an idea that is foundational to services we depend on like vocational guidance and career planning. But one of its key implications has until now been untested: that people who share the same job role will also have similar job interests. Now a surprising new study in the Journal of Vocational Behavior suggests that for many jobs, this simply isn’t true.

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Robot prototype will let you feel how it’s ‘feeling’

Robot prototype will let you feel how it’s ‘feeling’

In 1872, Charles Darwin published his third major work on evolutionary theory, “The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals,” which explores the biological aspects of emotional life. In it, Darwin writes: “Hardly any expressive movement is so general as the involuntary erection of the hairs, feathers and other dermal appendages … it is common throughout three of the great vertebrate classes.” Nearly 150 years later, the field of robotics is starting to draw inspiration from those words.

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Genetically modified babies given go ahead by UK ethics body

Genetically modified babies given go ahead by UK ethics body

The Nuffield Council on Bioethics says changing the DNA of a human embryo could be ‘morally permissable’ if it is in the child’s best interests. The creation of babies whose DNA has been altered to give them what parents perceive to be the best chances in life has received a cautious green light in a landmark report from a leading UK ethics body. The Nuffield Council on Bioethics said that changing the DNA of a human embryo could be “morally permissible” if it was in the future child’s interests and did not add to the kinds of inequalities that already divide society.

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Astronomers just discovered 12 new moons around Jupiter

Astronomers just discovered 12 new moons around Jupiter

A team out of the Carnegie Institution for Science haven't just discovered one new moon, they've discovered 12. All around the planet Jupiter. And these moons are helping us understand why Jupiter has so many moons in the first place.

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Test-tube rhinos? Experiment aims to save a vanishing species

Test-tube rhinos? Experiment aims to save a vanishing species

Scientists say they’ve used human test-tube baby techniques to try to save the nearly extinct northern white rhino. In an improbable experiment, they are trying to resurrect an entire subspecies using dead males, two infertile remaining females, and some closely related southern white rhinos. And they say they also plan to use stem-cell technology to try to create a population of pure northern white rhinos in the lab.

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What Knitting Can Teach You About Math

What Knitting Can Teach You About Math

In this professor's class, there are no calculators. Instead, students learn advanced math by drawing pictures, playing with beach balls—and knitting

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Crispr Can Speed Up Nature—and Change How We Grow Food

Crispr Can Speed Up Nature—and Change How We Grow Food

It took thousands of years for humans to breed a pea-sized fruit into a beautiful beefsteak tomato. Now, with gene editing, scientists can change everything.

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Loneliness is contagious – and here's how to beat it

Loneliness is contagious – and here's how to beat it

One in three adults is affected by loneliness. It's time for us to take a risk and let others into our lives, says Olivia Remes, PhD candidate at the Cambridge Institute of Public Health, writing for The Conversation. Loneliness is a common condition affecting around one in three adults. It damages your brain, immune system, and can lead to depression and suicide. Loneliness can also increase your risk of dying prematurely as much as smoking can – and even more so than obesity.

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Adult Stem Cells Anti-Aging Potential

Adult Stem Cells Anti-Aging Potential

During the early 2000s the stem cell industry took some heavy hits when using using embryonic stem cells was challenged, leaving all but a few lines of those cells excluded from federal research grants.

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How a particle accelerator helped recover tarnished 19th century images

How a particle accelerator helped recover tarnished 19th century images

With the aid of a particle accelerator, scientists are bringing back ghosts from the past, revealing portraits hidden underneath the tarnished surface of two roughly 150-year-old silver photographic plates. Researchers used an accelerator called a synchrotron to produce strong, but nondamaging beams of X-rays to scan the damaged photographs, called daguerreotypes, and map their chemical composition.

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Monday, 16 July 2018

NASA’s New Vasimr Plasma Engine Could Reach Mars In Less Than 6 Weeks

NASA’s New Vasimr Plasma Engine Could Reach Mars In Less Than 6 Weeks

NASA recently delivered $10 million in funding to Ad Astra Rocket Company of Texas for further development of its Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR), an electromagnetic thruster proficient of propelling a spaceship to Mars in just 39 days. NASA’s funding was part of the “12 Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnership.”

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Einstein’s Theory of Gravity passes yet another Test - Absolute Knowledge

Einstein’s Theory of Gravity passes yet another Test - Absolute Knowledge

An international team of researchers have shown that Einstein’s insights into gravity hold true, even in extreme scenarios.Albert Einstein came up with a theory in 1905 which said that the laws of Physics are exactly the same for the observers who are either at rest or moving with uniform velocity. Similarly, the speed of light in a vacuum is completely independent of the movement of the observers.

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