Wednesday, 15 August 2018

Tuesday, 14 August 2018

An inversion of nature: how air conditioning created the modern city

An inversion of nature: how air conditioning created the modern city

The shopping mall, the office block, suburbs, museums, Hollywood, the Gulf cities – air conditioning powered them all. But has the time come to turn it off?

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Collaborate, but only intermittently, says new study

Collaborate, but only intermittently, says new study

Technologies and organizations should be redesigned to intermittently isolate people from each other's work for best collective performance in solving complex problems.

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World Reaches 1,000GW of Wind and Solar, Keeps Going

World Reaches 1,000GW of Wind and Solar, Keeps Going

Bloomberg NEF data indicate that the world has attained the landmark figure of 1TW of wind and solar generation capacity installed.

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A Harvard Scientist Thinks He Has a Gene Test for Heart Attack Risk. He Wants to Give It Away Free.

A Harvard Scientist Thinks He Has a Gene Test for Heart Attack Risk. He Wants to Give It Away Free.

A Harvard scientist thinks he's reached a new milestone: a genetic test that helps identify people who are at high risk of having a heart attack. Can he convince doctors to use it? "I think--in a few years, I think everybody will know this number, similar to the way we know our cholesterol right now," muses Sekar Kathiresan, director of the Cardiovascular Disease Initiative at the Broad institute and a professor at Harvard Medical School.

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After 30 years of R&D, breakthrough announced in dark matter detection technology, definitive search to begin for axion particles

After 30 years of R&D, breakthrough announced in dark matter detection technology, definitive search to begin for axion particles

Forty years ago, scientists theorized a new kind of low-mass particle that could solve one of the enduring mysteries of nature: what dark matter is made of. Now a new chapter in the search for that particle has begun. This week, the Axion Dark Matter Experiment (ADMX) unveiled a new result, published in the journal Physical Review Letters, that places it in a category of one: it is the world’s first and only experiment to have achieved the necessary sensitivity...

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Electric Cars Could Soon Be Charged In Seconds With A New 'Flow Battery'

Electric Cars Could Soon Be Charged In Seconds With A New 'Flow Battery'

A revolutionary new battery technology could allow electric cars to be fully charged in seconds, instead of the hours it currently takes. Developed by chemists at the University of Glasgow, the ‘flow battery’ contains a liquid filled with nano molecules that can release energy as either electrical power or hydrogen.

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Are diesel’s days numbered? A view from a trip to BYD’s electric bus factory

Are diesel’s days numbered? A view from a trip to BYD’s electric bus factory

Buses emit a lot of carbon dioxide, but BYD is making our fleets cleaner.

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Moderate Salt Intake May Not Increase Risk of Heart Diseases, Says Study

Moderate Salt Intake May Not Increase Risk of Heart Diseases, Says Study

A new study published in the journal Lancet has indicated that we may have been demonising salt a little too much.

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Extreme temperatures 'especially likely for next four years'

Extreme temperatures 'especially likely for next four years'

Cyclical natural phenomena that affect planet’s climate will amplify effect of manmade global warming, scientists warn

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New neuroimaging research helps explain why psychopaths lie effortlessly

New neuroimaging research helps explain why psychopaths lie effortlessly

A new study sheds light on the neural basis of dishonest behavior in psychopathic individuals. The new research has been published in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. “For many years, I have studied the neural basis of deception using a cognitive neuroscience approach,” said study author Nobuhito Abe of the Kokoro Research Center at Kyoto University.

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Vaping may damage immune system and lead to lung disease, study suggests

Vaping may damage immune system and lead to lung disease, study suggests

Vaping speeds up the death of lung cells by 50 fold and could trigger lung diseases in later life, a new study suggests.

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Nasa's Parker probe sets off on quest for closeup view of the sun

Nasa's Parker probe sets off on quest for closeup view of the sun

A Nasa spacecraft is rocketing towards the sun on a quest to get closer to our star than anything ever sent before. The Parker solar probe will fly straight through the wispy edges of the corona, or outer solar atmosphere, which was visible during last August’s total solar eclipse. It eventually will get within 3.8m miles (6.1m km) of the sun’s surface, staying comfortably cool despite the extreme heat and radiation, allowing scientists to explore the sun in a way never before possible.

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To Fix That Pain In Your Back, You Might Have To Change The Way You Sit

To Fix That Pain In Your Back, You Might Have To Change The Way You Sit

In the past century, many Americans have lost the ability to sit in a way that doesn't strain their backs. Specialists say we could take a lesson from excellent sitters from other cultures.

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The Death Of Richard Sipe

The Death Of Richard Sipe

A peerless chronicler of clerical sex and 'culture of deceit.' By Rod Dreher.

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Monday, 13 August 2018

Australians sue over birth control implant

Australians sue over birth control implant

The women say the Essure implant may have caused wide-ranging problems, including chronic pain.

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The Fastest-Sinking City in the World

The Fastest-Sinking City in the World

With frequent floods, sinking markets and engulfed homes, by 2050 parts of Jakarta will be underwater.

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How smallpox claimed its final victim

How smallpox claimed its final victim

How did British medical worker Janet Parker become the world's last victim of smallpox? By Monica Rimmer.

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Rosemary's Ephemral Maggot

Rosemary's Ephemral Maggot

Mating may last anywhere from 30 minutes to 2 hours

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Cancer: one in four too scared to seek medical help over symptom

Cancer: one in four too scared to seek medical help over symptom

People with signs of the disease are failing to act, with many worrying they will waste a doctor’s time, a new survey reveals. Despite discovering a potential symptom of cancer, half the UK population would not seek medical help with many too afraid that they may be wasting a doctor’s time by raising it. In addition, one in four people would not bother having a symptom examined for fear of what the doctor might find, according to a new survey by Populus.

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Sunday, 12 August 2018

Poor mental health days may cost the economy billions of dollars

Poor mental health days may cost the economy billions of dollars

Poor mental health may cost businesses nearly as much as physical health problems, according to researchers. A single extra poor mental health day in a month was associated with a 1.84 percent drop in the per capita real income growth rate, resulting in $53 billion less total income each year.

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NASA looks to build a robot that can search other planets for bacteria

NASA looks to build a robot that can search other planets for bacteria

Such an instrument could allow researchers to look for extraterrestrial microbial life directly.

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Conservatives call for constitutional intervention last seen 230 years ago

Conservatives call for constitutional intervention last seen 230 years ago

Lawmakers push for ‘constitutional convention’ to restrict federal government – and it’s not as far fetched as it sounds. By Jamiles Lartey.

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The Nastiest Feud in Science

The Nastiest Feud in Science

Gerta keller was waiting for me at the Mumbai airport so we could catch a flight to Hyderabad and go hunt rocks. “You won’t die,” she told me cheerfully as soon as I’d said hello. “I’ll bring you back.” Death was not something I’d considered as a possible consequence of traveling with Keller, a 73-year-old paleontology and geology professor at Princeton University. She looked harmless enough: thin, with a blunt bob, wearing gray nylon pants and hiking boots, and carrying an insulated ShopRite supermarket bag by way of a purse.

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What Happens When a Pipeline Runs Afoul of Government Rules? Authorities Change the Rules

What Happens When a Pipeline Runs Afoul of Government Rules? Authorities Change the Rules

Federal authorities halted work on the massive Mountain Valley Pipeline this month after an appeals court ruled that federal agencies neglected to follow environmental protections. By Kate Mishkin, Beena Raghavendran, Ken Ward Jr.

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Children of religious parents have a reduced risk of suicidal behavior, study finds

Children of religious parents have a reduced risk of suicidal behavior, study finds

Children face a lower risk of suicidal behavior if their parents are religious, according to new research published in JAMA Psychiatry. The study found that parents’ belief in the importance of religion was associated with a lower risk for suicidal behavior by their children, regardless of a child’s own beliefs.

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Salt not as damaging to health as previously thought, says study

Salt not as damaging to health as previously thought, says study

New research reignites a row with scientists who want to reduce salt intake to near zero

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Study shows global forest loss over past 35 years has been more than offset by new forest growth

Study shows global forest loss over past 35 years has been more than offset by new forest growth

A team of researchers from the University of Maryland, the State University of New York and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has found that new global tree growth over the past 35 years has more than offset global tree cover losses. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes using satellite data to track forest growth and loss over the past 35 years and what they found by doing so.

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Men take care of their spouses just as well as women (new research suggests)

Men take care of their spouses just as well as women (new research suggests)

Men respond to their spouse’s illness just as much as women do and as a result are better caregivers in later life than previous research suggests, according to a new Oxford University collaboration. The study, published in Journals of Gerontology, Series B, is good news for our increasingly stretched adult care services, which have become more reliant on patients’ family and spouses for support. Conducted with peers from the University of Pennsylvania...

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Nailed it: Milton Glaser's 'Space Force' logo

Nailed it: Milton Glaser's 'Space Force' logo

Bloomberg Businessweek asked eight designers to come up with logos for Trump's inane "Space Force." Milton Glaser nailed it. The image represents the relentless intrusion of our president in every aspect of our lives and future. The image can be read as his next conquest or simply that there is very little inside that skull.

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Saturday, 11 August 2018

Sea urchins help researchers fight reef-smothering algae

Sea urchins help researchers fight reef-smothering algae

A management approach that combines manual removal and outplanting native sea urchin is effective in reducing invasive, reef-smothering macroalgae by 85 percent on a coral reef off O Ľahu, according to researchers. Globally, the health of coral reefs is threatened due to rising ocean temperatures and ocean acidification. Local factors such as invasive macroalgae also pose a serious risk to coral reefs—monopolizing reef habitats and overgrowing and smothering native species, such as corals.

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New study finds it’s harder to turn off a robot when it’s begging for its life

New study finds it’s harder to turn off a robot when it’s begging for its life

The robot told test subjects it was scared of the dark and pleaded ‘No! Please do not switch me off!’

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FBI seeks motive after U.S. airline worker stole plane and crashed it

FBI seeks motive after U.S. airline worker stole plane and crashed it

Federal authorities on Saturday were seeking to learn what drove an airline worker to steal an empty airplane from Seattle's airport in a security scare that caused the scrambling of U.S. fighter jets and ended when the plane crashed onto a sparsely populated island.

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Nasa postpones 'mission to the Sun'

Nasa postpones 'mission to the Sun'

US space agency Nasa has delayed its a mission to send a satellite closer to the Sun than any before. The Parker Solar Probe was set to launch from Cape Canaveral, Florida on Saturday, but last-minute investigations have delayed it for 24 hours. It is now scheduled to blast off - on board the mammoth Delta-IV Heavy rocket - on Sunday morning.

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Friday, 10 August 2018

The mysterious Pilostyles is a plant within a plant

The mysterious Pilostyles is a plant within a plant

Only when flowering is Pilostyles visible externally, the flowers erupting from the stems of its host like a weird botanical Alien.

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Is your dog lying to other dogs about its size?

Is your dog lying to other dogs about its size?

Don’t mess with me! That’s the signal small dogs seem to be sending when they pee on things, according to a new study. Researchers have found that the smaller a pooch is, the higher it lifts its leg to mark lamp posts, trees, and other objects—and these exaggerated urine streams may fool other dogs into thinking a large canine is in the area.

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Airbus' solar-powered aircraft just flew for a record 26 days straight 

Airbus' solar-powered aircraft just flew for a record 26 days straight 

A solar-powered aircraft from the European aerospace giant Airbus has completed a maiden flight lasting 25 days, 23 hours, and 57 minutes. The new Zephyr S HAPS (High Altitude Pseudo-Satellite) took off from Arizona on July 11 and went on to complete "the longest duration flight ever made," Airbus Defence and Space said in an announcement Wednesday. An application has been made to confirm the flight as a new world record.

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Do people with a high IQ age more slowly?

Do people with a high IQ age more slowly?

By David Robson. Greater intelligence may mean that you feel younger than your years – and this seems to be reflected in biological measures of ageing.

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Psychologists surveyed hundreds of alt-right supporters. The results are unsettling.

Psychologists surveyed hundreds of alt-right supporters. The results are unsettling.

Results show supporters are prejudiced, dehumanizing, and aggressive.

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Red Tide Is Devastating Florida's Sea Life. Are Humans to Blame?

Red Tide Is Devastating Florida's Sea Life. Are Humans to Blame?

"Anything that can leave has, and anything that couldn't leave has died." By Maya Wei-Haas, photographs by Ben Depp.

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How These Animals Stay Forever Young

How These Animals Stay Forever Young

A handful of species have seemingly avoided the aging process. By Erica Tennenhouse.

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These strange worlds are too hot to be planets, and too cool to be stars

These strange worlds are too hot to be planets, and too cool to be stars

Ultra-hot Jupiters are a new class of exoplanets that astronomers are increasingly finding scattered throughout the cosmos. These incredibly hot gas giants sit much closer to their host stars than Mercury does to the Sun, which invariably leads to tidal locking — meaning the same side of the planet always faces the star. This causes dayside temperatures to exceed 3,500 degrees Fahrenheit (1,900 Celsius), while nightside temperatures hover around 1,800 F (1,000 C). Furthermore, ultra-hot Jupiters display unique atmospheric characteristics that are not seen in other types of planets, such as an apparent lack of most molecules.

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What does a meteor sound like?

What does a meteor sound like?

When a meteor screams through our upper atmosphere, it’s a silent show for us here on the ground. Most meteors burn up dozens of miles above the surface, and even if a sonic boom reaches us it comes minutes after the visual spectacle.

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Astronomers report the most distant radio galaxy ever discovered

Astronomers report the most distant radio galaxy ever discovered

After nearly 20 years, the record of the most distant radio galaxy ever discovered has been broken. A team led by Ph.D. student Aayush Saxena (Leiden Observatory, the Netherlands) has found a radio galaxy from a time when the universe was only 7 percent of its current age, at a distance of 12 billion light-years.

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Teeth from a mega-shark twice the size of a Great White found in Australia

Teeth from a mega-shark twice the size of a Great White found in Australia

Fossil enthusiast Philip Mullaly was walking along the beach in Victoria Australia when he saw it: a glint in a boulder with quarter of a tooth exposed. "I was immediately excited, it was just perfect and I knew it was an important find that needed to be shared with people," Mullaly explained.

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Thursday, 9 August 2018

The ‘Witch Hunters’

The ‘Witch Hunters’

Trump may be paranoid, but he has real enemies among the emeriti of the intelligence establishment, and among them are the authors of three new books that collectively have sold up to a million copies: James Clapper, Michael Hayden, and James Comey. By Tim Weiner.

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Is Your Gut Making You Depressed or Anxious?

Is Your Gut Making You Depressed or Anxious?

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen goes straight for the gut with three surprising mind-gut connections.

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Inside the Very Big, Very Controversial Business of Dog Cloning

Inside the Very Big, Very Controversial Business of Dog Cloning

Barbra Streisand is not alone. At a South Korean laboratory, a once-disgraced doctor is replicating hundreds of deceased pets for the rich and famous. It’s made for more than a few questions of bioethics.

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How Primary Care Data and Machine Learning Can Detect Dementia

How Primary Care Data and Machine Learning Can Detect Dementia

The researchers built a model to predict whether a patient had dementia, based on information known as Read data, which are routinely collected by primary care doctors in the United Kingdom’s National Health System. They found that of nearly 25,000 patients, 2,000 were potentially living with undiagnosed dementia, with 95 percent confidence, according to the study.

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How kids shape their parents’ parenting style

How kids shape their parents’ parenting style

In our culture we like to speculate about the effects of different parenting styles on children. A lot of this debate is wasted breath. Twin studies – that compare similarities in outcomes between genetically identical and non-identical twins raised by their biological or adopted parents – have already shown us that parental influence is far more modest than we usually assume.

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