Tuesday, 23 January 2018

Plants to uncover landmines. (2004)

Plants to uncover landmines. (2004)

A genetically engineered plant that detects landmines in soil by changing colour could prevent thousands of deaths and injuries by signalling where explosives are concealed.

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Scientists have figured out how to make wounds heal without scars.

Scientists have figured out how to make wounds heal without scars.

If you've ever wondered why scar tissue looks so different from regular skin, it's because scar tissue doesn't contain any fat cells or hair follicles.

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Neuroscientists call for more comprehensive view of how brain forms memories

Neuroscientists call for more comprehensive view of how brain forms memories

UChicago neuroscientists argue that research on how memories form in the brain should consider activity of groups of brain cells working together, not just the connections between them.

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A Stellar Bubble: When an ageing star shed its outer layers, this blue bubble was left behind.

A Stellar Bubble: When an ageing star shed its outer layers, this blue bubble was left behind.

This eye-catching image of the planetary nebula Abell 33 was taken by astronomers using the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope in Chile. Created when an ageing star blew off its outer layers, this beautiful blue bubble is, by chance, aligned with a foreground star. This cosmic gem is unusually symmetric, appearing to be almost perfectly circular on the sky.

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Exercise May Help Reduce Depression in Teens

Exercise May Help Reduce Depression in Teens

Depression is a serious mental health condition that has been connected with suicidal behaviors among adults and youth. Symptoms of depression may include: sadness, feeling hopeless, loss of interest in hobbies, decreased energy, and thoughts of death or suicide (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, HHS; 2015). In a study published in the December 2017 issue of Evidence-Based Practice in Child and Adolescent Mental Health, the authors report that exercise may help reduce depression symptoms among adolescents.

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Monday, 22 January 2018

When Earth was a Snowball

When Earth was a Snowball

The Earth hasn't always been the blue, hospitable planet it is today. On at least three occasions our planet was completely covered with ice. How did the Earth get into this state and, above all, how did it manage to get out of it?

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Scientists Have Figured Out Why Human Skin Doesn't Leak

Scientists Have Figured Out Why Human Skin Doesn't Leak

Our skin might give us grief sometimes, but one thing we can always depend on it to do is not start indiscriminately leaking blood and sweat everywhere - despite the fact that we're shedding roughly 500 million cells every 24 hours.

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No Passport or Ticket: How a Woman Evaded Airport Security and Flew to London

No Passport or Ticket: How a Woman Evaded Airport Security and Flew to London

Marilyn Hartman has successfully sneaked onto three flights since 2014 and attempted to breach airport security at least a dozen times.

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Scientists Invent a Way to Measure Impossibly Tiny Amounts of Liquid

Scientists Invent a Way to Measure Impossibly Tiny Amounts of Liquid

The device can measure how quickly liquid travels through a tube smaller than a human hair.

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Why Bitcoin is taken more seriously than Dogecoin

Why Bitcoin is taken more seriously than Dogecoin

Cryptocurrencies encompass a wide range of technologies, communities and uses. Not all of them are taken seriously.

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Crowbars: Vending Machines Reward Crows for Cleaning Up Cigarette Butts

Crowbars: Vending Machines Reward Crows for Cleaning Up Cigarette Butts

Each year, trillions of cigarette butts are thrown on the streets of cities worldwide, but what if a highly intelligent urban creature could be trained to pick them up, and even be automatically gi…

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Juice Company Dumped Orange Peels In A Deforested Area - Here's What It Looks Like After 16 Years

Juice Company Dumped Orange Peels In A Deforested Area - Here's What It Looks Like After 16 Years

A couple of ecologists named Daniel Janzen and Winnie Hallwachs had an idea for a local orange juice company in Costa Rica — little did they know, their idea would lead to a discovery of a lifetime. In 1997, the pair approached the orange juice company and had a proposition for them. If they donated a piece of completely unspoiled, forested land to the Área de Conservación Guanacaste, then they could dump their discarded peels and pulp free of charge.

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Sunday, 21 January 2018

Meteorite hunters find first fragments of Michigan meteor

Meteorite hunters find first fragments of Michigan meteor

Meteorite hunters who flocked to Detroit from across the U.S. after a meteor exploded are finding the fragments.

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A hiker found human bones dating back more than 5,000 years

A hiker found human bones dating back more than 5,000 years

A local hiker in Ireland stumbled across an unusual cave-like chamber last year. Upon discovering what appeared to be human remains scattered on the ground of the cave, Michael Chambers called the police. But, they’re not part of a recent crime. Rather, researchers recently confirmed some of the bones date back to as early as 3,600 BC, according to The Irish Times.

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The Magnetohydrodynamic Drive Is Real—and You Can Build One

The Magnetohydrodynamic Drive Is Real—and You Can Build One

All you need is a battery, a magnet, and some wires to build your own quasi-fictional submarine drive. By Rhett Allain.

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Saturday, 20 January 2018

49% of Japan's largest coral reef has bleached: Environment Ministry

49% of Japan's largest coral reef has bleached: Environment Ministry

Some 49.9 percent of Sekisei coral reef -- Japan's largest -- had bleached by the end of 2017, the Environment Ministry has revealed. The figure is substantially less than the bleaching ratio of 91.4 percent on the reef between Okinawa Prefecture's Ishigaki and Iriomote islands at the end of 2016. However, "the water temperature remains high and the bleaching ratio is still high. We can't be optimistic," said an Environment Ministry official. "Coral in the area hasn't shown signs of real recovery, and remains in critical condition."

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British ‘Robot Scientist’ Eve Uses AI To Discover That A Toothpaste Ingredient Can Kill Malarial Parasites

British ‘Robot Scientist’ Eve Uses AI To Discover That A Toothpaste Ingredient Can Kill Malarial Parasites

An artificially-intelligent robot developed at the University of Cambridge has impressed its makers by discovering that an ingredient found in most toothpaste could help fight drug-resistant malaria. Every year, thousands of people across the world die from malaria, a disease passed to humans by mosquitos. Most of the deaths are reported from southeast Asia and Africa. According to the World Health Organization, about 212 million malaria cases were reported worldwide in 2015.

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Onion 'could help TB antibiotic fight'

Onion 'could help TB antibiotic fight'

A type of onion could help the fight against antibiotic resistance in cases of tuberculosis, a study has suggested. Researchers believe the antibacterial properties extracted from the Persian shallot could increase the effects of existing antibiotic treatment. They said this could help "reverse the tide" of drug-resistant TB, which infected 490,000 people in 2016.

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Face of 9,000-Year-Old Teenager Reconstructed

Face of 9,000-Year-Old Teenager Reconstructed

Her name is Avgi, and the last time anyone saw her face was nearly 9,000 years ago. When she lived in Greece, at the end of the Mesolithic period around 7000 B.C., the region was transitioning from a society of hunter gatherers to one that began cultivating its own food. In English, Avgi translates to Dawn—a name archaeologists chose because she lived during what's considered the dawn of civilization.

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China's Quantum-Key Network, the Largest Ever, Is Officially Online

China's Quantum-Key Network, the Largest Ever, Is Officially Online

The Chinese satellite Micius has once again shattered records, this time enabling practical quantum encryption between Beijing and Austria.

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Elon Musk will make driverless cars a reality sooner than you think

Elon Musk will make driverless cars a reality sooner than you think

Elon Musk has promised the world that a completely automated Tesla will be available by the end of 2018. Although other companies revise their estimates for self-driving vehicles in the consumer market - Waymo has pushed its date back to 2020, for instance - Musk is being coy. He'll have it ready even sooner.

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Nearly 100 Volcanoes Discovered Under Antarctic Ice Sheet

Nearly 100 Volcanoes Discovered Under Antarctic Ice Sheet

Nearly 100 previously unknown volcanoes, some of which are more than 12,000 feet tall, have been discovered hidden more than a mile beneath the extensive ice sheets of western Antarctica, according to researchers from the University of Edinburgh’s School of Geosciences.

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A Norwegian plane flew from New York to London in 5 hours 13 minutes — the fastest subsonic commercial transatlantic flight ever

A Norwegian plane flew from New York to London in 5 hours 13 minutes — the fastest subsonic commercial transatlantic flight ever

Norwegian — the low-cost airline that has made headlines for launching the world's longest low-cost flight — is making headlines again. A Norwegian Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner departing from New York JFK reached London Gatwick in 5 hours 13 minutes on Monday — the fastest subsonic transatlantic flight recorded on a commercial aircraft. It beat the previous record of 5 hours 16 minutes.

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Microsoft’s new drawing bot is an AI artist

Microsoft’s new drawing bot is an AI artist

Microsoft today is unveiling new artificial intelligence technology that’s something of an artist – a “drawing bot.” The bot is capable of creating images from text descriptions of an object, but it also adds details to those images that weren’t included the text, indicating that the AI has a little imagination of its own, says Microsoft.

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Putting Ancient Recipes on the Plate

Putting Ancient Recipes on the Plate

To better understand the distant past, it can help to taste and smell it.

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Friday, 19 January 2018

US astronaut removed from ISS mission

US astronaut removed from ISS mission

The US astronaut Jeanette Epps has been removed from her upcoming mission to the International Space Station (ISS) just months before launch. Dr Epps was to have been the first African-American astronaut assigned to the space station crew. She would have flown aboard a Russian Soyuz flight in June but is being replaced by another astronaut.

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Complex engineering and metal-work discovered beneath ancient Greek 'pyramid'

Complex engineering and metal-work discovered beneath ancient Greek 'pyramid'

More than 4,000 years ago builders carved out the entire surface of a naturally pyramid-shaped promontory on the Greek island of Keros. They shaped it into terraces covered with 1,000 tonnes of specially imported gleaming white stone to give it the appearance of a giant stepped pyramid rising from the Aegean: the most imposing manmade structure in all the Cyclades archipelago.

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Why Are Some People More Creative Than Others?

Why Are Some People More Creative Than Others?

Creativity is often defined as the ability to come up with new and useful ideas. Like intelligence, it can be considered a trait that everyone—not just creative “geniuses” like Picasso and Steve Jobs—possesses in some capacity. It’s not just your ability to draw a picture or design a product. We all need to think creatively in our daily lives, whether it’s figuring out how to make dinner using leftovers or fashioning a Halloween costume out of clothes in your closet.

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This tiny robot moves so fast it’s just a blur on camera

This tiny robot moves so fast it’s just a blur on camera

It makes up to 75 motions a second, and could be used in tiny factories or even surgery. Researchers at Harvard have created a new robot that’s the smallest, fastest, and most precise of its kind. It’s called the milliDelta, and can move so quickly — up to 75 motions a second — that on camera it’s just a blur. The bot could be put to a range of uses, says its creators, from working in assembly lines for making tiny circuitboards to assisting in delicate microsurgeries.

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Saturn's Fascinating Moon Titan Has Yet Another Thing in Common With Earth

Saturn's Fascinating Moon Titan Has Yet Another Thing in Common With Earth

Titan—Saturn’s largest moon—is remarkable in that it features a dense atmosphere and stable liquid at the surface. The only other place in the solar system with these particular characteristics is, you guessed it, Earth. Thanks to a pair of new studies, we can add a third trait to this list of shared characteristics: a global sea level.

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What's Actually Inside a Tide Pod?

What's Actually Inside a Tide Pod?

What exactly is happening when you wash your clothes with fatty acid salts in a candylike package?

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AI is continuing its assault on radiologists

AI is continuing its assault on radiologists

A new model can detect abnormalities in x-rays better than radiologists—in some parts of the body, anyway.

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Scientists Edge Closer To A Blood Test To Detect Cancers

Scientists Edge Closer To A Blood Test To Detect Cancers

This blood test detected signs of cancer in 70 percent of people with eight common forms of the disease. But it was much less good at identifying cancer in people in the early stages.

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Epsilon Rocket

Epsilon Rocket

Smoke trails made by an Epsilon rocket are seen during the morning sunrise over Kimotsuki town in Kagoshima prefecture, Japan. The Epsilon rocket, carrying the ASNARO-2 radar satellite developed by NEC, was launched from the JAXA Uchinoura Space Center.

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Thursday, 18 January 2018

Blindness treatment will insert algae gene into people’s eyes

Blindness treatment will insert algae gene into people’s eyes

Optogenetic techniques that use light to control nerve cells are being tried in people at last – and could lead to treatments for several types of blindness

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AI 'scientist' finds that toothpaste ingredient may help fight drug-resistant malaria

AI 'scientist' finds that toothpaste ingredient may help fight drug-resistant malaria

An ingredient commonly found in toothpaste could be employed as an anti-malarial drug against strains of malaria parasite that have grown resistant to one of the currently used drugs.

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Deadly Storm hits Netherlands and Germany

Deadly Storm hits Netherlands and Germany

A fierce storm sweeping across northern Europe kills five people and halts Dutch and German trains.

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Why do meteoroids explode in the atmosphere?

Why do meteoroids explode in the atmosphere?

Researchers have identified a new and previously overlooked process for air penetration that may explain the powerful explosion of the Chelyabinsk meteoroid.

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Being too intelligent might make you a less effective leader

Being too intelligent might make you a less effective leader

Asking staff about the qualities of a good leader is a surefire way to get them talking. Most would agree that having vision, people skills and integrity are important. And you would also expect intelligence to feature well up the list of desired attributes. But new research suggests that having a very high IQ is not necessarily such a good thing when it comes to leadership – the brightest people are actually less effective leaders, according to new research.

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Want to Sell Vegan Food? Don’t Call It ‘Vegan,’ Says Expert

Want to Sell Vegan Food? Don’t Call It ‘Vegan,’ Says Expert

If you’ve ever eaten at a quality vegan restaurant with a non-vegan, you’ve likely heard this statement: “Man, this stuff is amazing for vegan food!” That final qualifier underscores an interesting contradiction recently put forth by an expert in the field of food sustainability: The best way to sell more vegetarian and vegan food might be to not even point out that its vegetarian or vegan at all.

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Wednesday, 17 January 2018

The Beauty of Webb Telescope’s Mirrors

The Beauty of Webb Telescope’s Mirrors

The James Webb Space Telescope’s gold-plated, beryllium mirrors are beautiful feats of engineering. From the 18 hexagonal primary mirror segments, to the perfectly circular secondary mirror, and even...

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Bizarre Multicoloured “Cloudbow” seen above Darwin,Austrailia

Bizarre Multicoloured “Cloudbow” seen above Darwin,Austrailia

WE’VE heard of clouds having silver linings, but Northern Territory locals have been treated to the sight of clouds with a stunning rainbow lining.

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NASA says skyscraper-sized asteroid headed toward Earth is ‘potentially hazardous’

NASA says skyscraper-sized asteroid headed toward Earth is ‘potentially hazardous’

Imagine a piece of rock the size of the Burj Khalifa skyscraper speeding through space 15 times faster the world’s fastest manned aircraft. Now imagine that piece of rock buzzing toward Earth on it…

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World's Biggest Underwater Cave Found in Mexico

World's Biggest Underwater Cave Found in Mexico

A group of divers has found a connection between two underwater caverns in eastern Mexico to reveal what is believed to be the biggest flooded cave on the planet, a discovery that could help shed new light on the ancient Maya civilization.

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Turning Soybeans Into Diesel Fuel Is Costing Us Billions

Turning Soybeans Into Diesel Fuel Is Costing Us Billions

The law that requires America to turn some of its soybeans into diesel fuel for trucks has created a new industry. But it's costing American consumers about $5 billion each year.

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Researchers discover new catalyst for efficiently converting waste carbon dioxide into plastic

Researchers discover new catalyst for efficiently converting waste carbon dioxide into plastic

Researchers have developed a method for efficiently converting carbon dioxide into plastic. They say their findings could help divert carbon dioxide – a major contributor to climate change – from entering the atmosphere. They could also help to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. A team of scientists from University of Toronto, University of California, Berkeley and the Canadian Light Source (CLS) successfully managed to work out the ideal conditions for converting carbon dioxide to ethylene.

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Here's a Perfect Example of Why You Shouldn't Stifle Your Sneeze

Here's a Perfect Example of Why You Shouldn't Stifle Your Sneeze

Before you try to stifle your sniffle to avoid a loud, snotty sneeze, heed some advice from a 34-year-old man in England who ruptured his throat while trying that trick: Don't do it. The man ended up hospitalized and barely able to speak or swallow after he tried to stop a sneeze by holding his nose and shutting his mouth, according to a new report of his case.

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Suspected Meteor Shakes Houses across Metro Detroit

Suspected Meteor Shakes Houses across Metro Detroit

Thunderous boom shakes homes across metro Detroit

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Tuesday, 16 January 2018

China builds ‘world’s biggest air purifier’ – and it works

China builds ‘world’s biggest air purifier’ – and it works

An experimental tower over 100 metres (328 feet) high in northern China – dubbed the world’s biggest air purifier by its operators – has brought a noticeable improvement in air quality, according to the scientist leading the project, as authorities seek ways to tackle the nation’s chronic smog problem.

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How DNA Testing Botched My Family's Heritage, and Probably Yours, Too

How DNA Testing Botched My Family's Heritage, and Probably Yours, Too

My grandfather was caramel-skinned with black eyes and thick, dark hair, and until he discovered that he was adopted, he had no reason to suspect that he was not the son of two poor Mexicans as he’d always been told. When he found his adoption papers, according to family lore, he pestered the nuns at the Dallas orphanage where he had lived as an infant for the name of his birth mother. Name in hand, at 10 years old, he hopped a bus to Pennsylvania, met his birth mother, and found out that he was actually Syrian.

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