Saturday, 30 November 2019

Jupiter's Great Red Spot isn't dead yet, scientist says

Jupiter's Great Red Spot isn't dead yet, scientist says

Rumors of the super-storm's death have been greatly exaggerated, according to a team of engineers.

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Scientists spot huge stellar black hole, many times bigger than ever thought possible

Scientists spot huge stellar black hole, many times bigger than ever thought possible

Astronomers have spotted a huge stellar black hole in our galaxy, many times bigger than ever thought possible. Scientists thought that such black holes could only reach about 20 times the mass of the Sun. But the newly discovered object is 70 times great, astronomers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences say.

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Humans May Be Solely to Blame for the Great Auk’s Extinction

Humans May Be Solely to Blame for the Great Auk’s Extinction

The great auk, a large, flightless bird with a black back and a white belly, once lived across the North Atlantic—from Scandinavia to the eastern coast of Canada. Since prehistoric times, humans hunted these great animals, which could reach two-and-a-half feet in height, for their meat and eggs. But around the early 16th century, when European seaman discovered the large auk populations of Newfoundland, the killing of the birds reached rapacious levels.

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Doggone it! How an 18,000-year-old puppy could change everything we know about dogs

Doggone it! How an 18,000-year-old puppy could change everything we know about dogs

Dogor was two months old when he died and has been well preserved in the Siberian ice. But is he an early modern wolf – or one of the world’s very oldest domesticated dogs?

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Friday, 29 November 2019

How to make phone batteries that last longer

How to make phone batteries that last longer

A breakthrough in battery technology would be an engineering triumph and spur to other technologies.

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We Discovered Toilet Sloths And Found Hell

We Discovered Toilet Sloths And Found Hell

We have seen the depths of hell, and it is a sloth. A cheerful-faced, slow-moving two-toed sloth, peering out of its comfortable position, snugly ensconced in... a human toilet.

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The artificial skin that allows robots to feel

The artificial skin that allows robots to feel

Robots are one step closer to gaining a human sense that has so far eluded them: Touch. Scientists last month unveiled an artificial skin that enables robots to feel and respond to physical contact, a skill that will be needed as they come in increasingly close contact with people.

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Thursday, 28 November 2019

Wednesday, 27 November 2019

Is Quality Better Than Quantity in Social Relationships?

Is Quality Better Than Quantity in Social Relationships?

Though the term social network can mean the network of friends, family, and neighbors we deal with on a regular basis, it can be much more than that. Many people describing their own social networks may also include the people they interact with online, professional contacts, old classmates, or casual acquaintances.

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For the First Time, Scientists Record the Slow Beat of a Blue Whale's Heart

For the First Time, Scientists Record the Slow Beat of a Blue Whale's Heart

The largest heart on earth — a 400-pound blood-pumping machine — beats about 13 times a minute. That’s according to scientists' first recordings of the heart of a blue whale. The research team documented the rhythms thanks to a few suction cups that kept a heart rate monitor attached to a whale swimming and diving around California's Monterey Bay.

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What Is Static Electricity? We May Finally Have an Answer.

What Is Static Electricity? We May Finally Have an Answer.

This model, created by doctoral students, provides a convincing explanation for a mystery that is thousands of years old - the cause of static electricity.

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Tuesday, 26 November 2019

100-Year-Old Negatives Discovered in Block of Ice in Antarctica

100-Year-Old Negatives Discovered in Block of Ice in Antarctica

For the past 100 years, a box of never-before-seen negatives has been preserved in a block of ice in Antarctica. Recently, Conservators of the New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust came across the 22 exposed, but unprocessed, cellulose nitrate negatives during an attempt to restore an old exploration hut.

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Study shows that listening to music everyday improves mental health

Study shows that listening to music everyday improves mental health

A study by The British Academy Of Sound Therapy shows that listening to music everyday can greatly improve your mental health. 

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Internet Companies Prepare to Fight the ‘Deepfake’ Future

Internet Companies Prepare to Fight the ‘Deepfake’ Future

Researchers are creating tools to find A.I.-generated fake videos before they become impossible to detect. Some experts fear it is a losing battle.

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Researchers reach milestone in quantum standardization

Researchers reach milestone in quantum standardization

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a method that could pave the way to establishing universal standards for measuring the performance of quantum computers. The new method, called cycle benchmarking, allows researchers to assess the potential of scalability and to compare one quantum platform against another.

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Canadians dying at a higher rate in areas with more air pollution

Canadians dying at a higher rate in areas with more air pollution

Air pollution—even at levels below national and international air quality guidelines—is associated with an increased risk of deaths in Canada, according to new UBC research.

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While We Worry About Honeybees, Other Pollinators Are Disappearing

While We Worry About Honeybees, Other Pollinators Are Disappearing

While We Worry About Honeybees, Other Pollinators Are Disappearing

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Nine Species of Human Once Walked Earth. Now There's Just One. Did We Kill The Rest?

Nine Species of Human Once Walked Earth. Now There's Just One. Did We Kill The Rest?

Nine human species walked the Earth 300,000 years ago. Now there is just one. The Neanderthals, Homo neanderthalensis, were stocky hunters adapted to Europe's cold steppes.

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Psilocybin for major depression granted Breakthrough Therapy by FDA

Psilocybin for major depression granted Breakthrough Therapy by FDA

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted psilocybin therapy a Breakthrough Therapy designation for the second time in a year, this time with a view on accelerating trials testing its efficacy treating major depressive disorder (MDD).

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Monday, 25 November 2019

Machine learning has revealed exactly how much of a Shakespeare play was written by someone else

Machine learning has revealed exactly how much of a Shakespeare play was written by someone else

Literary analysts have long noticed the hand of another author in Shakespeare’s Henry VIII. Now a neural network has identified the specific scenes in question—and who actually wrote them.

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This Trash Eating Boat Can Clean Up The Rivers

This Trash Eating Boat Can Clean Up The Rivers

Today we are facing so many environmental problems out of which one is water pollution. We are throwing away all the garbage directly into our lakes, rivers and oceans. We just can’t imagine how much waste is already present in our water bodies and therefore in the end we have to rely on new technologies and devices which can help us in cleaning our lakes and oceans.

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Daring Mars mission to send rocks back to Earth in hunt for past life

Daring Mars mission to send rocks back to Earth in hunt for past life

Engineers plan to collect rocks on Mars and bring samples to Earth, in one of the most complex robot space projects envisaged. The scheme, being developed by Nasa and the European Space Agency (Esa), will involve robot rovers finding rocks that might contain evidence of past life.

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Sunday, 24 November 2019

AI Could Replace Chemical Testing on Animals

AI Could Replace Chemical Testing on Animals

Most consumers would be dismayed with how little we know about the majority of chemicals. Only 3 percent of industrial chemicals – mostly drugs and pesticides – are comprehensively tested. Most of the 80,000 to 140,000 chemicals in consumer products have not been tested at all or just examined superficially to see what harm they may do locally, at the site of contact and at extremely high doses.

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Negative Effects of Antidepressants

Negative Effects of Antidepressants

Antidepressant medication is the most commonly prescribed treatment for people with depression. They are also commonly prescribed for other conditions, including bipolar depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, chronic pain syndromes, substance abuse and anxiety and eating disorders.

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Scientists find a place on Earth where there is no life

Scientists find a place on Earth where there is no life

Living beings, especially microorganisms, have a surprising ability to adapt to the most extreme environments on our planet, but there are still places where they cannot live. European researchers have confirmed the absence of microbial life in hot, saline, hyperacid ponds in the Dallol geothermal field in Ethiopia.

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Nail salon workers suffer chemical exposures that can be like working at a garage or a refinery

Nail salon workers suffer chemical exposures that can be like working at a garage or a refinery

The technician who gave you that shiny manicure may be inhaling dangerous levels of toxic chemicals on the job.

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Saturday, 23 November 2019

Why you might be counting in the wrong language

Why you might be counting in the wrong language

Learning numbers in a European language has probably affected your early maths ability. It turns out there are better ways to count.

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A.I.'s are helping design new molecules using quantum chemistry

A.I.'s are helping design new molecules using quantum chemistry

In the fast-paced, complicated world of quantum chemistry, A.I.’s are used to help chemists calculate important chemical properties and make predictions about experimental outcomes. But, in order to do this accurately, these A.I. need to have a pretty strong understanding of the fundamental rules of quantum mechanics, and researchers of a new interdisciplinary study on the topic say these quantum predictions have been lacking for some time. A new machine learning framework could be the answer.

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'Not cool': telescope faces interference from space-bound satellites

'Not cool': telescope faces interference from space-bound satellites

A flagship observatory that will map the heavens in spectacular detail and search the skies for asteroids on a collision course with Earth faces serious disruption from a new wave of satellites bound for space, the Guardian has learned.

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China’s Deadly Air Pollution Is Also Costing Billions in Solar Efficiency

China’s Deadly Air Pollution Is Also Costing Billions in Solar Efficiency

China is leading the way on renewable energy, having installed half the world's solar panels in 2017. But its transformative economic growth fueled by coal and other fossil fuels and its outsized manufacturing sector have coughed up so much air pollution that it has blocked adequate sunlight from reaching its solar panels, according to a new study published this week in Nature Energy.

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A.I. use is still rising globally, but most firms' tech isn't yet close to 'real' intelligence

A.I. use is still rising globally, but most firms' tech isn't yet close to 'real' intelligence

Every time someone asks a smart fridge to remind them to pick up milk, they’re helping lay the groundwork for what’s expected to be a $100 billion world-changing industry. A fridge’s artificial intelligence (AI) digests the user’s words, running them through machine-learning software, which gets smarter every time you talk to it, said Dorando Doo, senior vice president at iFlytek, a Chinese AI firm. As the fridge’s software gets smarter, it’ll help inform a wide range of other AI systems.

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Friday, 22 November 2019

Designer baby revolution could be less than two years away, research suggests

Designer baby revolution could be less than two years away, research suggests

The creation of so-called designer babies could begin within two years, according to new research. Dr Kevin Smith, a bioethicist from Abertay University in Dundee, has published analysis that claims the risks of gene editing are now low enough to warrant its use with human embryos.

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Loneliness Is Fatal. Video Games Can Keep Men Alive.

Loneliness Is Fatal. Video Games Can Keep Men Alive.

MEN ARE LONELY, or so we’ve heard. Not from our friends—that would require actually sharing our feelings, which we’re not great at—but from an endless cascade of think pieces and scientific studies sounding the alarm on the growing crisis of male loneliness. Reluctant to engage with other men on anything that could make us seem vulnerable or too needy, we’ve been forcing the women in our lives to shovel our shit, becoming “emotional gold diggers” in the process.

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Boeing Starliner to cost $90 Million per seat

Boeing Starliner to cost $90 Million per seat

NASA's Inspector General (IG) predicts that the US will have to spend $90 million per seat for flights on the CST-100 Starliner, a spacecraft currently being constructed by Boeing

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Thursday, 21 November 2019

Astronomers catch water erupting from plumes on Jupiter’s icy moon Eu

Astronomers catch water erupting from plumes on Jupiter’s icy moon Eu

Astronomers made the first direct measurement of water vapor in Europa’s atmosphere. It's the best evidence yet for water plumes erupting from the icy moon.

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This Is How Elon Musk Can Fix The Damage His Starlink Satellites Are Causing To Astronomy

This Is How Elon Musk Can Fix The Damage His Starlink Satellites Are Causing To Astronomy

In any field of business or industry, the prevailing rule has always been that if there isn't a law against it, you are free to do it. If there are no rules protecting a resource, you are free to use or take as much of it as you want to further your own ends. Until regulatory measures are put into place, disruptors and innovators are free to regulate themselves, often to the extraordinary detriment of those who depended on those now-scarce resources.

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The 4 Biggest Myths About Plant-Based Foods

The 4 Biggest Myths About Plant-Based Foods

Dietitians debunk the lies food manufacturers want you to believe about processed soy.

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Simply Imagining Other People Can Change Our Own Sense Of Self

Simply Imagining Other People Can Change Our Own Sense Of Self

So begins a new paper, published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, which reveals that who you “are” can easily be manipulated. Just imagining somebody else can alter all kinds of aspects of how you see yourself, even including your personality and memories.

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Antarctic tests will prepare this rover for a possible trip to an icy ocean moon

Antarctic tests will prepare this rover for a possible trip to an icy ocean moon

Exploring a distant moon usually means trundling around its uniquely inhospitable surface, but on icy ocean moons like Saturn's Enceladus, it might be better to come at things from the bottom up.

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Exclusive: Humans placed in suspended animation for the first time

Exclusive: Humans placed in suspended animation for the first time

Doctors have placed humans in suspended animation for the first time, as part of a trial in the US that aims to make it possible to fix traumatic injuries that would otherwise cause death. Samuel Tisherman, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, told New Scientist that his team of medics had placed at least one patient in suspended animation, calling it “a little surreal” when they first did it. He wouldn’t reveal how many people had survived as a result.

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Conspiracy Theorists Are Less Angry Than the Rest of Reddit, Study Finds

Conspiracy Theorists Are Less Angry Than the Rest of Reddit, Study Finds

The path to the million-member-strong league on Reddit’s r/conspiracy is paved with politics, toxicity, and tech culture, a sprawling study has found. From an eight-year sample ranging from 2007 to 2015, a team of Australian researchers compared 15,370 r/conspiracy posters to an equal number of users who’d started out posting on Reddit in similar forums to discover what drives people to conclude that the royal family went on human hunting parties.

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Wednesday, 20 November 2019

What America Lost When It Lost the Bison

What America Lost When It Lost the Bison

By migrating in huge herds, bison behave like a force of nature, engineering and intensifying waves of spring greenery that other grazers rely on.

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Scientists 3-D Print Skin That Develops Working Blood Vessels

Scientists 3-D Print Skin That Develops Working Blood Vessels

A promising new technique could lead to lasting skin grafts after burns or other injuries

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Massive simulation of the universe shows how galaxies form and die

Massive simulation of the universe shows how galaxies form and die

A massive simulation of the universe is digitally recreating the lives of stars, black holes and galaxies. Richard Bower at Durham University in the UK and his colleagues have created a computer simulation approximately 1 billion light years across, which models tens of thousands of galaxies.

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Unpublished data from Stanley Milgram's experiments cast doubt on his claims about obedience

Unpublished data from Stanley Milgram's experiments cast doubt on his claims about obedience

An analysis of previously unpublished data raises serious questions about Stanley Milgram’s landmark obedience experiments. The findings, which have been published in Social Psychology Quarterly, indicate that many people were willing to engage in seemingly reprehensible behavior because they saw through the researchers’ cover story. Those who believed the cover story, on the other hand, tended to be more defiant.

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Nanomaterials in wastewater have toxic effects on crustaceans and fish

Nanomaterials in wastewater have toxic effects on crustaceans and fish

You may not always think about it when you do your laundry or flush the toilet, but whatever you eat, wear or apply on your skin ends up in wastewater and eventually reaches the environment. The use of nanoparticles in consumer products like textiles, foods and personal care products is increasing. What is so special about nanoparticles is their tiny size: One nanometer is one-billionth of a meter.

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Why the electric-car revolution may take a lot longer than expected

Why the electric-car revolution may take a lot longer than expected

An MIT analysis finds that steady declines in battery costs will stall in the next few years.

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You Can Make a Rocket Engine's Entire Combustion Chamber in One 3D Print

You Can Make a Rocket Engine's Entire Combustion Chamber in One 3D Print

A rocket startup called Launcher has made the largest liquid-fuel combustion chamber ever 3D printed in a single piece, requiring a custom-made 3D printing setup. The chamber is part of Launcher’s all-3D-printed rocket engine, designed to lower cost barriers for launching private small satellites into low Earth orbit.

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A Black Hole Threw a Star Out of the Milky Way Galaxy

A Black Hole Threw a Star Out of the Milky Way Galaxy

So long, S5-HVS1, we hardly knew you.

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