Thursday, 2 May 2019

The Man Who’s Going to Save Your Neighborhood Grocery Store

The Man Who’s Going to Save Your Neighborhood Grocery Store

American food supplies are increasingly channeled through a handful of big companies: Amazon, Walmart, FreshDirect, Blue Apron. What do we lose when local supermarkets go under?

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Apollo 11 astronauts took a lot of drugs for trip around dark side of the moon

Apollo 11 astronauts took a lot of drugs for trip around dark side of the moon

When Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins blasted off on their Apollo 11 moon-landing mission on July 16, 1969, they were set for quite a trip. They were carrying drugs — a lot of drugs — as they planned to go around the dark side of the moon and land on the Sea of Tranquility. It was the groovy 1960s, after all. But there was nothing nefarious about their stash on board the Saturn V rocket.

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How Technology Is Transforming The Food Industry

How Technology Is Transforming The Food Industry

When it comes to food, tech isn’t always the first thing that comes to mind. However, technology over the years has changed how we produce and find our food through applications, robotics, data and processing techniques. According to a recent report from ING, technology helps food manufacturers produce more efficiently for a growing world population. There are 7.5 billion people in the world right now and that means a higher demand for food each year. By using tech to improve processing and packaging, it can improve the shelf life and safety of food.

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The smart diaper is coming. Who actually wants it?

The smart diaper is coming. Who actually wants it?

Huggies launched diapers that monitor your baby’s poop and pee in Korea. Next up: the US?

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The elements, in haiku

The elements, in haiku

An interactive review of the periodic table -- composed of 119 haiku

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Dark Matter Gets a Reprieve in New Analysis

Dark Matter Gets a Reprieve in New Analysis

A strange glow coming from the Milky Way’s center was thought to be due to ordinary pulsars. But a new look at a years-old study shows that dark matter might still be responsible.

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AR will mean dystopia if we don’t act today

AR will mean dystopia if we don’t act today

The martial arts actor Jet Li turned down a role in the Matrix and has been invisible on our screens because he does not want his fighting moves 3D-captured and owned by someone else. Soon everyone will be wearing 3D-capable cameras to support augmented reality (often referred to as mixed reality) applications. Everyone will have to deal with the sorts of digital-capture issues across every part of our life that Jet Li avoided in key roles and musicians have struggled to deal with since Napster. AR means anyone can rip, mix and burn reality itself.

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Alzheimer's disease is a 'double-prion disorder,' study shows

Alzheimer's disease is a 'double-prion disorder,' study shows

Two proteins central to the pathology of Alzheimer's disease act as prions—misshapen proteins that spread through tissue like an infection by forcing normal proteins to adopt the same misfolded shape—according to new UC San Francisco research.

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Wednesday, 1 May 2019

'Water Worlds' Are Common In Milky Way, Says Research. So Why Not In The Solar System?

'Water Worlds' Are Common In Milky Way, Says Research. So Why Not In The Solar System?

New research into data on exoplanets suggests that 'super-Earths' and water-rich 'sub-Neptunes' between two and four times bigger than Earth are likely to be water worlds containing at least 25% water-dominated ices or fluids, and not the gas dwarfs with a rocky core than many astronomers thought.

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iPhone users are twice as likely to text and drive as Android users

iPhone users are twice as likely to text and drive as Android users

In observation of Distracted Driving Month this April, The Zebra, an insurance comparison site, surveyed 2,107 Americans to uncover what activities are distracting them on the road. The survey revealed that 78% of Americans admit to engaging in activities other than concentrating on the road, even though the majority of them (66%) feel guilty while doing so. And iPhone users are twice as likely to text and drive as Android users.

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NASA Says Two of Its Rockets Failed Because of Metals Fraud

NASA Says Two of Its Rockets Failed Because of Metals Fraud

According to the agency, a contractor lied about the quality of its metals for years, causing two failed rocket launches.

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Not dead but gone: how a concussion changed my girlfriend's personality forever

Not dead but gone: how a concussion changed my girlfriend's personality forever

We have no place in our culture for this kind of grief. Gabrielle was still there – it just wasn’t the her I had loved

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NASA head: Expect a major asteroid strike in your lifetime

NASA head: Expect a major asteroid strike in your lifetime

Visions of space rocks slamming into Earth aren't just for dinosaurs and Hollywood movies.

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Life May Have Evolved Before Earth Finished Forming

Life May Have Evolved Before Earth Finished Forming

The first organisms may have evolved before the rocky planets formed. By Mike Wall.

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Are the dead taking over Facebook? A Big Data approach to the future of death online

Are the dead taking over Facebook? A Big Data approach to the future of death online

We project the future accumulation of profiles belonging to deceased Facebook users. Our analysis suggests that a minimum of 1.4 billion users will pass away before 2100 if Facebook ceases to attract new users as of 2018. If the network continues expanding at current rates, however, this number will exceed 4.9 billion.

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Prepare for Earth to be hit by a meteor in your lifetime, Nasa chief says

Prepare for Earth to be hit by a meteor in your lifetime, Nasa chief says

Dangerous asteroids flying past Earth are not rare, and more meteor strikes happen than the public is aware of, the head of Nasa has said. At the International Academy of Astronautics’ Planetary Defence Conference on Monday, Nasa administrator Jim Bridenstine said: “I wish I could tell you these events are exceptionally unique … but they’re not.” He said more work is now underway to protect our planet from the impact of meteor strikes.

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Never-Before-Seen Phenomenon: Black Hole Ejects Plasma And Drags Spacetime

Never-Before-Seen Phenomenon: Black Hole Ejects Plasma And Drags Spacetime

Share Scientists have spotted a mind-blowing phenomenon that has never been seen so far. There’s a black hole that’s about 8,000 light years away from Earth which has caught the eye of astronomers due to its really strange nature. V404 Cygni black hole  The Daily Mail reports that the black hole is called V404 Cygni …

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The moon may be made from a magma ocean that once covered Earth

The moon may be made from a magma ocean that once covered Earth

There are a number of theories about where the moon came from. Our best guess is that it was formed when the Earth was hit by a large object known as Theia. The impact threw up huge amounts of debris into orbit, which eventually coalesced to form the moon.

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Tuesday, 30 April 2019

Is Life Expectancy Finally Topping Out?

Is Life Expectancy Finally Topping Out?

A slowing rate of improvement hints at a looming asymptote, at least on a population-wide basis

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SpaceX Gets FCC Approval to Sell Wireless High-Speed Home Internet from Space

SpaceX Gets FCC Approval to Sell Wireless High-Speed Home Internet from Space

SpaceX just received approval from the FCC to launch 4,425 satellites into space to build a low earth orbit network of satellites to sell home Internet. Unlike current satellite Internet, these devices will be in a far lower orbit and offer far faster speeds without the data caps current satellite systems use.

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What If the Asteroid Never Killed the Dinosaurs?

What If the Asteroid Never Killed the Dinosaurs?

An asteroid slammed down and did away with all the dinosaurs, paving the way for such developments as the human race, capitalism, and posting on the internet: it’s the story we all know and love. Yet if things had shaken out differently—if the asteroid had stayed in its place, and the dinosaurs allowed to proceed with their business—what would things have looked like?

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How the Parker Solar Probe Survives Close Encounters With the Sun

How the Parker Solar Probe Survives Close Encounters With the Sun

Over the past six decades, 12 people have walked on the moon, spacecraft have visited every planet from Mercury to Neptune, and four rovers have racked up more than 60 kilometers traveling on the surface of Mars. And yet, despite the billions of dollars spent on the world’s civilian space programs, never has a probe journeyed very close to the sun. The nearest approach, by the Helios B probe in 1976, came no closer than 43 million km.

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Teen Suicide Spiked After Debut Of Netflix's '13 Reasons Why,' Study Says

Teen Suicide Spiked After Debut Of Netflix's '13 Reasons Why,' Study Says

Boys ages 10-17 killed themselves at a much higher rate in the month after Netflix's show about suicide was released in 2017. Researchers attribute an extra 195 deaths that year to the series.

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SpaceX cuts broadband-satellite altitude in half to prevent space debris

SpaceX cuts broadband-satellite altitude in half to prevent space debris

SpaceX has received Federal Communications Commission approval to halve the orbital altitude of more than 1,500 planned broadband satellites in order to lower the risk of space debris and improve latency. SpaceX's satellite project, named Starlink, aims to provide high-speed, low-latency broadband around the world. In a statement on the new FCC approval, SpaceX said that "Starlink production is well underway, and the first group of satellites have already arrived at the launch site for processing."

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Light-based computer hardware that can compete with silicon

Light-based computer hardware that can compete with silicon

A team of researchers at NTT Corporation has developed a way to use light-based computer hardware that allows it to compete with silicon. In their paper published in the journal Nature Photonics, the group describes their research, the devices they created and how well they worked.

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To prevent the apocalypse, MIT says to study "machine behaviour"

To prevent the apocalypse, MIT says to study "machine behaviour"

Computer scientists and engineers shouldn’t be the only people shaping the future of artificial intelligence, according to a group led by researchers from MIT’s Media Lab. “We’re seeing the rise of machines with agency, machines that are actors making decisions and taking actions autonomously,” MIT’s Iyad Rahwan said in a blog post. “This calls for a new field of scientific study that looks at them not solely as products of engineering and computer science, but additionally as a new class of actors with their own behavioral patterns and ecology.”

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Biodegradable plastic bags could be just as bad for the environment, research finds

Biodegradable plastic bags could be just as bad for the environment, research finds

Supposedly ‘eco-friendly’ biodegradable and compostable plastic bags exist in the environment for three years, littering scenery and potentially trapping animals, new research has found. Single-use plastic bag use in the UK has been cut from 8 billion a year in 2014 to just over a billion in 2018, but the research from the University of Plymouth has raised serious questions over the sustainability of alternatives which claim to be better for the environment.

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Monday, 29 April 2019

New Harvard Findings Suggest That Seafood lovers Have More Sex and Make More Babies

New Harvard Findings Suggest That Seafood lovers Have More Sex and Make More Babies

Are you a lover of sushi, shrimp cocktail and other sea-related foods? Then you’ll love to hear that in a recent study conducted by researchers from Harvard University, they found that eating seafood does not only improve sexual life but also go a long way to improve fertility.

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'Service with a smile'? Faking emotions at work makes you drink more, study suggests

'Service with a smile'? Faking emotions at work makes you drink more, study suggests

A recent study is suggesting employers should rethink policies encouraging workers to offer "service with a smile." The study published earlier this month in the peer-reviewed Journal of Occupational Health Psychology found employees who force themselves to smile or evoke or positive emotions in front of customers are more likely to drink heavily after they clock out.

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Artificial Intelligence Will Help Us Communicate With Animals

Artificial Intelligence Will Help Us Communicate With Animals

Many pet owners consider their animals to be a member of the family much like a son or daughter. But what if we could take our relationships a step further by using technology to communicate with animals? This may soon become a reality as scientists implement artificial intelligence to decode the disparate dialects of our zoological friends.

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At What Age Is Our Sense of Optimism at Its Highest?

At What Age Is Our Sense of Optimism at Its Highest?

Youth, they say, is wasted on the young. But what about optimism? New research published in the journal Social Psychology and Personality Science offers an in-depth look at how our sense of optimism evolves as we age. To study this question, researchers at the University of California Davis analyzed data from a large sample of Mexican-Americans between the ages of 26 and 71. At four time points across a seven-year period...

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Shutting down social media does not reduce violence, but rather fuels it

Shutting down social media does not reduce violence, but rather fuels it

Internet blackouts deprive people of impartial information and crucial connections with loved ones, without delivering improved safety or stability.

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Men’s beards are dirtier than dogs’ fur, study says

Men’s beards are dirtier than dogs’ fur, study says

The Hirslanden Clinic looked at the “bacterial load in colony-forming units (CFU) of human-pathogenic microorganisms” in swabs taken from 18 men’s beards and 30 dogs’ necks. All of the guys with beards had high microbial counts, but only 23 of the 30 dogs had the same high count.

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Mapping the second brain: The latest science on the effect of your gut bacteria and how to boost them

Mapping the second brain: The latest science on the effect of your gut bacteria and how to boost them

Greater diversity of gut bacteria has been associated with better gut health, although the mechanisms are still not well understood. Less diversity has been linked to conditions including irritable bowel, diabetes and obesity.

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If we care about plastic waste, why won’t we stop drinking bottled water?

If we care about plastic waste, why won’t we stop drinking bottled water?

or all the innovation and choice that define the food and drink industries, if you want to make money, you could do a lot worse than bung some water in a bottle and flog it. A litre of tap water, the stuff we have ingeniously piped into our homes, costs less than half a penny. A litre of bottled water can cost well over a pound, especially for something fancy that has been sucked through a mountain.

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Sunday, 28 April 2019

China targets nuclear fusion power generation by 2040

China targets nuclear fusion power generation by 2040

China aims to complete and start generating power from an experimental nuclear fusion reactor by around 2040, a senior scientist involved in the project said, as it works to develop and commercialize a game-changing source of clean energy.

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A Chernobyl 'suicide squad' of volunteers helped save Europe — here's their amazing true story

A Chernobyl 'suicide squad' of volunteers helped save Europe — here's their amazing true story

Less than two weeks after the infamous reactor meltdown at Chernobyl, officials decided to risk the lives of three men to potentially save millions of lives. A larger disaster could have spread radioactive fallout across Europe.

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Chicken grows face of dinosaur

Chicken grows face of dinosaur

Sixty-five million years ago, an asteroid is believed to have crashed into Earth. The impact wiped out huge numbers of species, including almost all of the dinosaurs. One group of dinosaurs managed to survive the disaster. Today, we know them as birds.

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The gig economy is distorting U.S. data on inflation, wages and job growth

The gig economy is distorting U.S. data on inflation, wages and job growth

Online shopping and the gig economy haven't just disrupted traditional brick-and-mortar business, they're disrupting the way U.S. job growth, wage data and inflation are tracked, asserts a new paper from the Dallas Federal Reserve. What it means: There has been an increase in the number of workers in the gig economy who are either working as contractors or are self-employed, but report themselves as employed. These workers often have less bargaining power and lower wages than full-time employees.

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Almost 200,000 Never-Before-Seen Viruses Were Just Discovered Hidden in Our Oceans

Almost 200,000 Never-Before-Seen Viruses Were Just Discovered Hidden in Our Oceans

The oceans hide all kinds of secrets and unknowns in the deep – like the 195,728 viruses that scientists just found lurking underwater, during the course of a pole-to-pole expedition carried out to survey marine life. The researchers say the vast m

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China Plans to Build a Moon Base Near the Lunar South Pole

China Plans to Build a Moon Base Near the Lunar South Pole

China plans to build a scientific research station on the moon in "about 10 years," according to the state news agency Xinhua. The China National Space Administration (CSNA) intends to build the research station in the region of the moon's south pole, Zhang Kejian, head of CSNA, said in a public statement, Xinhua reported. That's a bit of a departure from the six successful NASA Apollo moon landings, which took place closer to the moon's equator between 1969 and 1972.

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Self-Driving Catheter Robot Navigates the Heart for Surgery

Self-Driving Catheter Robot Navigates the Heart for Surgery

When navigating through dark environments, rats swish their whiskers against nearby objects to figure out where they are. As the animals explore, they use this sense of touch to build maps of unfamiliar places. Cockroaches and blind crayfish use their antennae in a similar approach. Now, the go-by-feel strategy has inspired the creation of a robotic catheter capable of finding its way through the beating heart of lives pigs during a surgical procedure without the help of a surgeon’s guiding hand.

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George M. Diggs, PhD — “Plant Defense Chemicals: The Dark Side of Food Plants“

George M. Diggs, PhD — “Plant Defense Chemicals: The Dark Side of Food Plants“

Some food plants can indeed cause problems in some humans.

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Friday, 26 April 2019

The universe is expanding faster than we thought, and no one knows why

The universe is expanding faster than we thought, and no one knows why

Explaining a discrepancy between what was happening 13 billion years ago and now may require new physics.

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‘You do think: why me?’ The shocking rise of lung cancer in non-smokers

‘You do think: why me?’ The shocking rise of lung cancer in non-smokers

The ‘smoker’s disease’ is affecting more and more people who have never lit up in their lives – and it is a particular problem among women. What do experts think is going on?

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New type of plastic is a recycling dream

New type of plastic is a recycling dream

These plastics can easily be disassembled to chemical building blocks.

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One industry millennials aren’t killing: Camping

One industry millennials aren’t killing: Camping

More than 78.8 million households camped at least once in 2018 and 41 percent of them were millennials.

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Scientists invent way to trap mysterious ‘dark world’ particle at Large Hadron Collider

Scientists invent way to trap mysterious ‘dark world’ particle at Large Hadron Collider

Now that they’ve identified the Higgs boson, scientists at the Large Hadron Collider have set their sights on an even more elusive target. All around us is dark matter and dark energy—the invisible stuff that binds the galaxy together, but which no one has been able to directly detect. “We know for sure there’s a dark world, and there’s more energy in it than there is in ours,” said LianTao Wang, a University of Chicago professor of physics who studies how to find signals in large particle accelerators like the LHC.

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Robots threaten middle-aged workers the most (that's anyone over 21)

Robots threaten middle-aged workers the most (that's anyone over 21)

Three papers from influential economists cast doubt on the idea that there are beneficial aspects to automation. Beneficial aspects to workers, that is.

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Rapid destruction of Earth-like atmospheres by young stars

Rapid destruction of Earth-like atmospheres by young stars

The discoveries of thousands of planets orbiting stars outside our solar system has made questions about the potential for life to form on these planets fundamentally important in modern science. Fundamentally important for the habitability of a planet is whether or not it can hold onto an atmosphere, which requires that the atmosphere is not completely lost early in the lifetime of the planet.

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